Curriculum

S. Korea Outlines Ambitious Plans for All-Digital Scholastic Network

By The Associated Press — October 17, 2011 1 min read
South Korean youngsters use tablet PCs to study in a class at Sosu Elementary School in Goesan. The country is one of the most wired in the world, with 80 percent of households having broadband access.
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

South Korea is taking a $2 billion gamble that its students are ready to ditch paper textbooks in favor of tablet PCs as part of a vast digital scholastic network.

France, Singapore, Japan, and other countries are racing to create classrooms where touch-screens provide instant access to millions of pieces of information. But South Korea—Asia’s fourth-largest economy—believes it enjoys an advantage over those countries, with students who are considered the world’s savviest navigators of the digital universe. A 2009 study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a Paris-based group of wealthy nations, found 15-year-olds in South Korea scored highest in their ability to absorb information from digital devices, beating runners-up New Zealand and Australia by a large margin.

More than 60 primary, middle, and high schools in South Korea are now using digital textbooks, and education officials in the country believe the $2.1 billion program can be completed by 2015.

A version of this article appeared in the October 19, 2011 edition of Digital Directions as S. Korea Outlines Ambitious Plans for All-Digital Scholastic Network

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
Teaching Live Online Discussion Seat at the Table: How Can We Help Students Feel Connected to School?
Get strategies for your struggles with student engagement. Bring questions for our expert panel. Help students recover the joy of learning.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Real-World Problem Solving: How Invention Education Drives Student Learning
Hear from student inventors and K-12 teachers about how invention education enhances learning, opens minds, and preps students for the future.
Content provided by The Lemelson Foundation

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Curriculum Opinion A Search for Common Ground: Navigating Tough Classroom Conversations
Should parents or legislators have a say in what subjects educators teach?
4 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Curriculum Spotlight Spotlight on Curriculum
This Spotlight will help you explore parental involvement in curriculum choices, how curriculum can help students’ media literacy, and more.
Curriculum Letter to the Editor Banning SEL Puts Students at Risk
Do those trying to ban social-emotional learning even understand what it is? asks this letter to the editor.
1 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty
Curriculum Spotlight Spotlight on Creative Learning
This Spotlight will empower you with findings about student motivation, the case for real-world problem-solving, and more.