Opinion
Science Letter to the Editor

Neuroscience Can Help Develop Instructional Tools

July 17, 2012 1 min read

To the Editor:

I was pleased to read the article “Neuroscientists Find Learning Is Not ‘Hard-Wired’” (June 6, 2012). It should go without saying that neuroscience can be a powerful ally to help teachers construct the most effective learning environment possible, but too often we are influenced—even biased—by “how it’s always been done” in both practice and research. Perhaps neuroscience can eventually become the catalyst for innovative instructional models.

The challenge facing education, however, is that many in research are overly attached to old ideas. Such attachment is bound to get in the way of authentic progress.

Dee Tadlock

Adjunct Faculty

Continuing Education

Central Washington University

Shelton, Wash.

A version of this article appeared in the July 18, 2012 edition of Education Week as Neuroscience Can Help Develop Instructional Tools

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