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GE Foundation’s Award Aimed at Math, Science

By Lesli A. Maxwell — November 05, 2007 1 min read
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The GE Foundation last week awarded a $22 million grant to the Atlanta public school system to revamp its science and mathematics curriculum across all grade levels, making Atlanta the latest recipient in a series of grants that the foundation has awarded to school districts since 2005 to improve students’ college readiness.

Beverly L. Hall, the superintendent of Atlanta’s 51,000-student district, said the award will be used to develop a rigorous, systemwide math and science curriculum and provide professional development for teachers.

The GE Foundation is the philanthropic arm of the General Electric Co. So far, as part of its College Bound program, the foundation has awarded $100 million to school districts, including Cincinnati; Erie, Pa.; Jefferson County, Ky.; and Stamford, Conn.

See Also

See other stories on education issues in Georgia. See data on Georgia’s public school system.

A version of this article appeared in the November 07, 2007 edition of Education Week

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