College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup

Early College

By Sarah D. Sparks — July 09, 2013 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Students who attended an early-college high school were more likely than their peers to earn a high school diploma and later a college degree, according to a new randomized longitudinal study of 10 schools in the Gates Early-College High School Initiative.

The initiative—launched in 2002 by the Seattle-based Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which also supports coverage of the education industry and K-12 innovation at Education Week—assists dual-enrollment schools targeted to students from backgrounds that are historically underrepresented in college. Independent researchers tracked students who applied by lottery to an early-college high school from 2005-06 to 2007-08 and compared the academic track records of the 1,044 students who got into the schools versus the 1,414 who didn’t.

While there were no significant differences between the groups in grade average or math achievement, the early-college students were 5 percentage points more likely to graduate from high school than the comparison group 86 percent versus 81 percent.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the July 11, 2013 edition of Education Week as Early College

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Assessment Webinar
The State of Assessment in K-12 Education
What is the impact of assessment on K-12 education? What does that mean for administrators, teachers and most importantly—students?
Content provided by Instructure
Jobs January 2022 Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Proven Strategies to Improve Reading Scores
In this webinar, education and reading expert Stacy Hurst will provide a look at some of the biggest issues facing curriculum coordinators, administrators, and teachers working in reading education today. You will: Learn how schools
Content provided by Reading Horizons

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

College & Workforce Readiness Spotlight Spotlight on Inspiring Innovation Through STEM Education
This Spotlight will empower you on ways to include more students of color, locate gifted students in unexpected places, and more.
College & Workforce Readiness 3 Ways to Help Students to Be the First in Their Families to Attend College
Alma Lopez, the 2022 ASCA School Counselor of the Year, offers advice on how to help first-generation students navigate college planning.
3 min read
Alma Lopez, school counselor coordinator at Livingston Middle School, at the school in Livingston, Calif., on December 14, 2021.
Alma Lopez, school counselor coordinator at Livingston Middle School, at the school in Livingston, Calif., on December 14, 2021.
Max Whittaker for Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion The High School Network Providing Students With On-the-Job Training
Rick Hess speaks with Cristo Rey Network President Elizabeth Goettl about the network's innovative work-study program.
7 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
College & Workforce Readiness From Our Research Center Class of COVID: 2021's Graduates Are Struggling More and Feeling the Stress
COVID-19 disrupted the class of 2020’s senior year. A year later, the transition to college has in some ways gotten worse.
7 min read
Conceptual illustration of young adults in limbo
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and Klaus Vedfelt/DigitalVision/Getty