College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup

College Completion

By Debra Viadero — October 05, 2010 1 min read
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States throughout the South should increase the percentage of working-age adults with postsecondary degrees or credentials to 60 percent by 2018, says a report by the Southern Regional Education Board.

According to the Atlanta-based board, the proportion of adults between the ages of 25 and 64 with a two- or four-year college degree currently ranges from 26 percent to 44 percent among the 16 SREB member states. Data are not available on the share of adults with career or technical certificates.

The report says more adults with postsecondary credentials are needed in order for the region to “remain economically competitive and continue to make social progress.”

It also sets out 10 recommendations states can follow to reach that goal, including making college more affordable, drawing more adults into higher education, and eliminating unnecessary credit requirements.

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A version of this article appeared in the October 06, 2010 edition of Education Week as College Completion

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