Curriculum

About This Series

February 14, 2001 1 min read

This is the second installment of a three-part series about Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic, a program run by the National Science Foundation.

In part one, published in the Dec. 13, 2000, issue, Education Week previewed the teachers’ preparations for their stints on the frozen continent, and examined efforts to engage teachers in ongoing scientific inquiry as a way to generate students’ enthusiasm for science.

For this installment, Assistant Editor David J. Hoff and Photo Editor Allison Shelley traveled to Antarctica last month as “media visitors” to witness the adventures of a teacher.

The journalists were chosen by the NSF, which runs a competitive program each year to select members of the news media to travel to Antarctica to write about the research the foundation finances. The independent federal agency provides the journalists with transportation, outdoor clothing, food, and shelter while on the continent.

While in Antarctica, Mr. Hoff and Ms. Shelley filed dispatches and accompanying photographs about their experiences in “On the Ice: Education Week Goes to Antarctica.”

For the final installment, set for spring publication, Education Week will follow up with the educators to describe how their participation in the NSF program has influenced their work in the classroom.

The series is available with additional photos at www.edweek.org/sreports/special_ice.htm.

A version of this article appeared in the February 14, 2001 edition of Education Week as About This Series

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