Law & Courts News in Brief

Texas Suit Dismissed

By Sean Cavanagh — April 21, 2009 1 min read
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A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by Chris Comer, a former employee of the Texas Education Agency, who resigned from her job in 2007 after she forwarded an e-mail to her colleagues advising them of a public appearance by a critic of creationism and intelligent design. Ms. Cowan quit her job after she said that agency officials threatened to fire her for the e-mail, warning her that her electronic message had violated the agency’s policy of impartiality on such issues. She then sued the agency.

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A version of this article appeared in the April 22, 2009 edition of Education Week

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