Federal

State Journal

March 28, 2001 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Survival of the Fizziest

Efforts to curb soft drink sales in schools went flat this month in both Maryland and Minnesota, despite concern among state legislators about the health effects of the drinks and what many see as a commercial invasion of public schools.

Members of the Senate education committee in Minnesota declined by a 29-6 vote to endorse a bill that would have banned sales of soda pop during the school day.

In Maryland, a broader bill limiting commercialism in schools—and including a provision similar to the Minnesota measure—went down to defeat in the Senate by a 26-18 vote.

In both states, school leaders and representatives of the soft drink and vending machine industries joined to quash the bills. They argued that schools could ill afford to lose the money that vending machine sales generate, and that regulation of food and drink sales was best left to districts.

“The members were very sympathetic, but they felt this was a local-control issue,” said Sen. Sandra L. Pappas, a Democrat who is the chairwoman of Minnesota’s Senate education committee.

Sen. Paul G. Pinsky, the Maryland Democrat who sponsored the bill there, called the situation in his state and elsewhere—where soft drinks are on sale during the school day under contracts with drink distributors worth thousands of dollars—"shameful and shameless.”

Though flouted by many high schools in Maryland, federal rules prohibit soda sales in school cafeterias at meal times, and state regulations ban them during any part of the school day. Mr. Pinsky’s bill would have forced districts to formulate policies on soft drink sales that at a minimum would reflect federal and state law.

The Maryland bill would also have prohibited advertising on school buses, clamped down on classroom materials with advertisements or company logos, and required schools to allow parents to keep their children from watching television programs at school that included advertising.

—Bess Keller

A version of this article appeared in the March 28, 2001 edition of Education Week

Events

School Climate & Safety K-12 Essentials Forum Strengthen Students’ Connections to School
Join this free event to learn how schools are creating the space for students to form strong bonds with each other and trusted adults.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
IT Infrastructure & Management Webinar
Future-Proofing Your School's Tech Ecosystem: Strategies for Asset Tracking, Sustainability, and Budget Optimization
Gain actionable insights into effective asset management, budget optimization, and sustainable IT practices.
Content provided by Follett Learning
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
Innovative Funding Models: A Deep Dive into Public-Private Partnerships
Discover how innovative funding models drive educational projects forward. Join us for insights into effective PPP implementation.
Content provided by Follett Learning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal Miguel Cardona in the Hot Seat: 4 Takeaways From a Contentious House Hearing
FAFSA, rising antisemitism, and Title IX dominated questioning at a U.S. House hearing with Education Secretary Miguel Cardona.
6 min read
Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona testifies during a House Committee on Education and Workforce hearing on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, May 7, 2024, in Washington.
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona testifies during a House Committee on Education and Workforce hearing on Capitol Hill on May 7 in Washington.
Mariam Zuhaib/AP
Federal Arming Teachers Could Cause 'Accidents and More Tragedy,' Miguel Cardona Says
"This is not in my opinion a smart option,” the education secretary said at an EdWeek event.
4 min read
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona speaks during Education Week’s 2024 Leadership Symposium at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Arlington, Va., on May 2, 2024.
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona speaks during Education Week’s 2024 Leadership Symposium at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Arlington, Va., on May 2, 2024.
Sam Mallon/Education Week
Federal Opinion Should Migrant Families Pay Tuition for Public School?
The answer must reflect an outlook that is pro-immigration, pro-compassion, and pro-law and order, writes Michael J. Petrilli.
Michael J. Petrilli
4 min read
Image of a pencil holder filled with a variety of colored pencils that match the background with international flags.
Laura Baker/Education Week via Canva
Federal New Title IX Rule Could Actually Simplify Some Things for Districts, Lawyers Say
School districts could field more harassment complaints, but they can streamline how they handle them, according to legal experts.
7 min read
Illustration of checklist.
F. Sheehan for Education Week + iStock / Getty Images Plus