Opinion Blog


Rick Hess Straight Up

Education policy maven Rick Hess of the American Enterprise Institute think tank offers straight talk on matters of policy, politics, research, and reform. Read more from this blog.

Policy & Politics Opinion

A Search for Common Ground in Schooling

By Rick Hess — March 08, 2021 3 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.

Today, Pedro Noguera and I release our new book, A Search for Common Ground: Conversations About the Toughest Questions in K-12 Education. We drafted the book as a continuous e-mail correspondence that unfolded between January and June 2020. We delved into the purpose of schooling, testing, school choice, the role of for-profits, philanthropy, civics, social and emotional learning, teacher pay, and much else, all against the backdrop of COVID-19, intense attention to issues of race, and a bitter (if mostly virtual) presidential contest.

In the course of our collaboration, we each argued from conviction while also striving to listen to one another, identify places of principled agreement, and model the kind of discourse that we want our kids to emulate. I’ll be honest, it wasn’t easy. Pedro and I see the world differently and sit in very different places. He’s the dean of a major school of education, an icon for members of outfits like the University Council of Education Administration (UCEA), and on the editorial board of The Nation. I head up the education program at the American Enterprise Institute, have been deemed one of the “most wanted” enemies of public education by the UCEA Review, and write regularly for National Review.

But we also hold some things in common. We both have strongly held principles but believe that sweeping sentiments matter less than how things work in the real world. We both believe that it’s important to squarely confront issues of inequality and opportunity, but that doing so must include a sensible commitment to foundational virtues like hard work, personal responsibility, and ensuring that schools are spending public funds wisely and well.

And we’ve both been frustrated at how often it’s presumed today that any disagreement over matters of principle, policy, or educational practice is due to the other party’s ignorance or malice. We wrote this book because we didn’t believe that to be true. The further along we got, the more I was convinced that it’s not.

In fact, I came away from the project realizing that the two of us have a lot more in common than I had thought (which was kind of the point). We tend to agree that practical considerations too often get short shrift in our education debates, that those on the “other side” of a debate frequently have honorable motives and valid points to make, and that you learn more from listening than righteous posturing.

You know, when we train educators, we talk a lot today about the need for “courageous conversations.” Well, Pedro and I agree that we have too few of these in practice. As we put it in the book, “The truth is, there’s nothing courageous about preaching to the choir. It’s not courageous for liberals to tell one another that they’re right or for conservatives to do the same. Courageous conversations require sitting down with those who see, think, and feel differently and then being willing to listen—not lecture.”

A big problem, though, is that social media and 24-7 news cycles make it hard to engage in sustained, patient conversation. Like everyone else in this connected world, educators, scholars, and advocates tend to rush from one thing to the next—from email to text messages to meetings to their news feed, with little time for reflection or sustained back-and-forth.

It turns out that breaking that polarized pattern of shouting and doubting is a lot easier when you’re not worried about squeezing a rejoinder into a Twitter post or reacting in real time to the latest outrage. It’s easier when you have the time to go back and forth and process what one another has said. In fact, the format of the project, with its opportunity for deliberate, sustained conversation, probably deserves as much credit as either of us for whatever value the book holds.

Our correspondence forced us to stay with uncomfortable topics when one of us might’ve preferred to move on, even as it allowed us to reflect and not just respond. We couldn’t simply settle for whatever quick quip or reflexive riposte leapt to mind. The opportunity to sit down, read each other’s take, consider it, and then gather our thoughts, and to do this time and again over an extended period, made for an all-too-uncommon experience.

In the end, writing this book was one of the most heartening, inspiring experiences I’ve had in years. I hope readers will be inclined to check it out. And, if you do, I’ll be most curious to hear whether you feel the same.

Related Tags:

The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Safe Return to Schools is Possible with Testing
We are edging closer to a nationwide return to in-person learning in the fall. However, vaccinations alone will not get us through this. Young children not being able to vaccinate, the spread of new and
Content provided by BD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
Meeting the Moment: Accelerating Equitable Recovery and Transformative Change
Educators are deciding how best to re-establish routines such as everyday attendance, rebuild the relationships for resilient school communities, and center teaching and learning to consciously prioritize protecting the health and overall well-being of students
Content provided by Campaign for Grade-Level Reading
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Addressing Learning Loss: What Schools Need to Accelerate Reading Instruction in K-3
When K-3 students return to classrooms this fall, there will be huge gaps in foundational reading skills. Does your school or district need a plan to address learning loss and accelerate student growth? In this
Content provided by PDX Reading

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal Biden Team: Schools Can Go Beyond Trump Rules in Response to Alleged Sexual Misconduct
The Education Department's guidance, released July 20, states that Title IX rules from 2020 lay out "minimum steps" for educators.
3 min read
Symbols of gender.
iStock/Getty
Law & Courts Praying Coach v. District That Suspended Him: What's Next in Fight Over Religious Expression
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit declined to reconsider an earlier panel ruling that sided with the school district.
4 min read
Bremerton High School assistant football coach Joe Kennedy, center in blue, kneels and prays after his team lost to Centralia in Bremerton, Wash., on Oct. 16, 2015. Kennedy, who was suspended for praying at midfield after games, has filed a discrimination complaint on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015 with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission according to The Liberty Institute, a Texas-based law firm representing the coach.
Joe Kennedy, center in blue, kneels and prays after a game in October 2015 when he was the assistant football coach at Bremerton High School in Bremerton, Wash. In a long-running legal fight, Kennedy contends he has First Amendment free-speech and free-exercise-of-religion rights to express his Christian faith while on the job. The case is likely headed back to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Lindsey Wasso/The Seattle Times via AP
Federal Fact Check: After Furor Over 1619 Project, Feds Adjust History and Civics Grant Plans
A previously obscure history and civics program has weathered a political storm, but what exactly has changed?
4 min read
Education secretary nominee Miguel Cardona speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination on Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Education secretary nominee Miguel Cardona speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination on Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP
States Who's Really Driving Critical Race Theory Legislation? An Investigation
Education Week reporting documents a complex web of individuals and conservative organizations supporting this far-reaching legislation.
15 min read
Conceptual image.
Collage by Laura Baker/Education Week (Images: DigitalVision Vectors and iStock/Getty)