States

Georgia Candidates Were Accused of Misconduct with Students

March 19, 2010 1 min read
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Two candidates for governor in Georgia—both of them former high school teachers—resigned their jobs in education after being accused, in unrelated cases, of inappropriate contact with female students.

Neither man was ever charged with criminal wrongdoing, but both had their teaching licenses suspended for a time by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The New York Times has a story about the two candidates today as well.

The candidates, Carl Camon, a Democrat, and Ray McBerry, a Republican, are hardly front-runners in a crowded field seeking to replace Republican Gov. Sonny Perdue, who can’t run again because of term limits.

But both said they will continue their campaigns for governor, despite the renewed attention on the past accusations, which the AJC obtained through the state’s open records act. Here are the links to summaries of Camon’s case and McBerry’s case, courtesy of the newspaper.

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A version of this news article first appeared in the State EdWatch blog.

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