States

Georgia Candidates Were Accused of Misconduct with Students

March 19, 2010 1 min read

Two candidates for governor in Georgia—both of them former high school teachers—resigned their jobs in education after being accused, in unrelated cases, of inappropriate contact with female students.

Neither man was ever charged with criminal wrongdoing, but both had their teaching licenses suspended for a time by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The New York Times has a story about the two candidates today as well.

The candidates, Carl Camon, a Democrat, and Ray McBerry, a Republican, are hardly front-runners in a crowded field seeking to replace Republican Gov. Sonny Perdue, who can’t run again because of term limits.

But both said they will continue their campaigns for governor, despite the renewed attention on the past accusations, which the AJC obtained through the state’s open records act. Here are the links to summaries of Camon’s case and McBerry’s case, courtesy of the newspaper.

Related Tags:

A version of this news article first appeared in the State EdWatch blog.

Events

School & District Management Webinar Examining the Evidence: Catching Kids Up at a Distance
As districts, schools, and families navigate a new normal following the abrupt end of in-person schooling this spring, students’ learning opportunities vary enormously across the nation. Access to devices and broadband internet and a secure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Branding your district matters. This webinar will provide you with practical tips and strategies to elevate your brand from three veteran professionals, each of whom has been directly responsible for building their own district’s brand.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Nearly two-thirds of U.S. school districts are using hybrid learning right now with varying degrees of success. Students and teachers are getting restless and frustrated with online learning, making curriculum engagement difficult and disjointed. While
Content provided by Samsung

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Elementary Teacher
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Special Education Teacher
Chicago, Illinois
JCFS Chicago
Elementary Teacher - Scholars Academy
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Clinical Director
Garden Prairie, IL, US
Camelot Education

Read Next

States States Renew Efforts to Track Student Attendance as Pandemic Stretches On
With thousands of students still chronically absent from school, most states have begun to reinstate daily attendance policies.
4 min read
Image shows empty desks in a classroom.
Chris Ryan/OJO Images
States Explainer School Employees May Get Early COVID-19 Vaccinations. Here's How States Will Decide When
State and federal leaders face a host of questions in allocating the scarce vaccine even among "essential workers," like those in education.
8 min read
Illustration of medical staff administering coronavirus vaccine
RLT Images/DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
States Teachers' Union Leader Nominated to Be Puerto Rico's Education Secretary
The American Federation of Teachers describes Elba Aponte Santos as "a fierce defender of public education" in Puerto Rico.
1 min read
Elba Aponte Santos
Elba Aponte Santos, the president of the Asociación de Maestros de Puerto Rico (AMPR), an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers, has been nominated to be Puerto Rico's next education secretary.
via Twitter
States States Can Wield Huge Influence Over Principal Quality. Are They Using It?
A new report identifies policy levers states already have at their disposal to better prepare principals for their jobs.
4 min read
Image shows an illustration of a man climbing a ladder, with encouragement.
iStock/Getty