Student Well-Being

Where To Go for More Information

April 19, 2000 2 min read
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PART II: April 19, 2000
Suicide: Many Schools
Fall Short on Prevention

Prevention: Los Angeles
Reaches Out

One School Strives
To Be Kinder, Gentler

Memphis: A District Under Emotional Renovation

S.D. Psychologist
Alone on the Range

Budget Battles
And Mental-Health Care

Gay Students: A Vulnerable Group

For More Information


PART I: April 12, 2000
Image Complex Set of Ills Spurs Rising Teen Suicide Rate


About This Series
To Learn More

The following are useful publications and World Wide Web sites that deal with suicide, suicide prevention, and mental health:

Suicide Intervention in the Schools, by Scott Poland; Guilford Press, 1989. A practical, 213-page book from the president-elect of the National Association of School Psychologists that examines the ways schools can prevent student suicides. Copies are available for $22.95 each plus $4 for mailing from Guilford Publications, 72 Spring Street, N.Y., N.Y. 10012 or in bookstores.

Coping With Crisis, by Scott Poland and Jami S. McCormick; Sopris West, 1999. A 433-page book for schools, parents, and communities on how to handle a school crisis, from bomb threats to shootings to suicides. Copies are available for $35 each from Sopris West, 4093 Specialty Place, Longmont, CO 80504; (303) 651-2829; www.sopriswest.com.

“Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999. A 487-page document that thoroughly reviews the current scientific research on mental-health problems, with extensive chapters on adolescents and what researchers say works to prevent youth suicide. Copies are $51 each, including mailing costs, from the Superintendent of Documents, PO Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954; (202) 512-1800.

Conquering the Beast Within: How I Fought Depression and Won and How You Can Win Too, by Cait Irwin; Random House, 1999. An illustrated book for students written by an Iowa teenager about her experience suffering from and surviving depression. With resource lists. $14 each. Widely available in bookstores.

Night Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide, by Kay Redfield Jamison; Alfred A. Knopf, 1999. The Johns Hopkins University psychiatrist, who wrote textbooks on manic-depressive illness, writes eloquently about suicide and its youngest victims. $26 each. Widely available in bookstores.

The Enigma of Suicide, by George Howe Colt; Simon and Schuster, 1991. A well-written and informative book by a former Life magazine writer. It delves into the puzzle of why people commit suicide and presents researchers’ best hopes for preventing it. $14 each. Widely available in bookstores.

“L.I.F.E.: A Teen Suicide Prevention Program.” A video and guide to teach students how to educate peers to identify classmates at risk for suicide and how and where to get help. The guide is available from the Jason Foundation Inc., 116 Maple Row Blvd., Suite C, Hendersonville, TN 37075; (615) 264-2323; www.jasonfoundation.com.


Web Sites:

American Association of Suicidology. A national organization dedicated to the understanding and prevention of suicide.

National Association of School Psychologists. Offers a range of resource guides and recommendations for schools on how best to prevent youth suicide and handle crises when they occur.

National Mental Health Association. Promotes mental health through advocacy, education, and research.

Suicide Prevention Advocacy Network. A national grassroots, nonprofit organization promoting suicide prevention, especially among young people.

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A version of this article appeared in the April 19, 2000 edition of Education Week as Where To Go for More Information

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