School Climate & Safety Video

Is ‘Hardening’ Schools to Prevent Shootings Really the Answer?

April 11, 2018 8:54

In the aftermath of the school shooting massacre in Parkland, Fla., this winter, there have been calls for “hardening” schools to protect against school attacks. Some have suggested adding metal detectors and more law enforcement officers, and arming teachers. Others say a better solution is creating a welcoming environment in schools, so students feel comfortable flagging anything that seems worrisome. The Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas, is trying to walk a middle ground. They have armed security, bullet-resistant lobbies, and a 24-hour tip line. Equally important, according to Superintendent Brian Woods, is understanding stressors “on kids and their families and trying to intervene in those stressors.” But he stresses that schools need to stay centers of learning, not prisons. We look at how Northside handles security in the era of school shootings. (April 10, 2018)

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