Equity & Diversity Video

Black Student Voices: What We Need From Our Schools

By Bridget Fetsko — July 30, 2020 5:26

Education Week spoke with 10 Black high school students from across the country about how they think issues of race and racism should be handled in school, discussing what students want educators to know, the impact of school security, and their experiences talking about race in classes. In the first video of this series, students share what they need from educators to improve their school experience. Students, they say, need a seat at the table so they can identify school policies that lead to inequities and advocate for things like representation within curricula and counseling supports. Highland High School student Jaden Adeyemi said, “As people of color and as youth, we know what we need. We don’t need teachers to tell us what we need.”

Bridget Fetsko
Visuals Intern Education Week
Bridget Fetsko is a former visuals intern for Education Week.
Related Tags:

Catherine Gewertz, Senior Contributing Writer; Sarah Schwartz, Staff Writer; and Madeline Will, Senior Staff Writer contributed to this video.

Video

Assessment Video Teachers, Try This: A 5-Minute Exercise to Reduce Student Test Anxiety
Inspired by a college professor, this teacher instituted “test talks” and helped reduce her students’ test anxiety.
3:16
Teaching Video Teachers, Try This: A Lesson on Journalism, Misinformation, and Different Points of View
This elementary teacher taught his students a valuable lesson on how we can each experience the same situation a little differently.
3:27
Teaching Video Teachers, Try This: Address Student Behavior Issues With Somatic Check-Ins
Through somatic check-ins, educators and students can learn better emotional regulation, and in turn improve classroom management.
3:55
Sixth-grade students collaborate in the classroom.
Sixth-grade students collaborate in the classroom.
Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for EDUimages
Teaching Video VIDEO: An Educator Answers FAQs on Teaching Black History
A Black educator answers educators' frequently asked questions around teaching Black history.
Dawnavyn M. James, Jaclyn Borowski & Elizabeth Rich
1 min read