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School Climate & Safety News in Brief

Suicide Rate Triples For Girls Ages 10-14

By Evie Blad — May 10, 2016 1 min read

Suicide rates across the nation are on the rise, according to new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But even though the numbers of suicides for children remain low compared with other populations, girls 10-14 had the highest growth of any group between 1999 and 2014. In that time, the rate of suicides for girls in that age group tripled—from 0.5 per 100,000 people to 1.5 per 100,000 people.

For boys ages 10-14, the rate climbed from 1.9 per 100,000 people to 2.6. Among females ages 15-24, the rate grew from 3 to 4.6 per 100,000 people, and among males in that age group, it grew from 16.8 to 18.2 per 100,000 people, the data show.

Suicide-prevention organizations say they have taken a new approach with schools in recent years, working to help teachers identify warning signs of suicide and mental-health issues at earlier ages.

A version of this article appeared in the May 11, 2016 edition of Education Week as Suicide Rate Triples For Girls Ages 10-14

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