Students of Color

Nurse Kathe Olmstead prepares a shot that is part of a possible COVID-19 vaccine being developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y., in July 2020. Pfizer Inc. has announced early results that the COVID-19 vaccine it’s developing with German company BioNTech is 90 percent effective.
Nurse Kathe Olmstead prepares a shot that is part of a possible COVID-19 vaccine being developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y., in July 2020. Pfizer Inc. has announced early results that the COVID-19 vaccine it’s developing with German company BioNTech is 90 percent effective.
AP Photo/Hans Pennink
Student Well-Being A Highly Effective Vaccine Is Likely on the Way. What Does That Mean for Schools and Kids?
Two infectious disease experts weigh in on how a COVID-19 vaccine that’s 90 percent effective, as early results are showing, could change school health and safety protocols.
Catherine Gewertz & Arianna Prothero, November 12, 2020
6 min read
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Special Education How Will Schools Pay for Compensatory Services for Special Ed. Students?
States’ efforts so far suggest there won’t be enough money to go around for all the learning losses of students with disabilities from COVID-19 school shutdowns.
Corey Mitchell, November 10, 2020
8 min read
11 Gwinnett article
Jeffrey Smith for Education Week
School & District Management How the Fight for America's Suburbs Started in Public Schools
A heated school board election in the fast-changing Atlanta suburbs pits Black Lives Matter vs. the “Suburban Lifestyle Dream.”
Benjamin Herold, October 26, 2020
26 min read
Magdalena Estiverne graduated from high school this past spring during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is currently taking online community college classes.
Magdalena Estiverne graduated from high school this past spring during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is currently taking online community college classes.
Eve Edelheit for Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness COVID-19's Disproportionate Toll on Class of 2020 Graduates
The pandemic hit college-bound members of the class of 2020 from low-income homes much harder than it did their better-off peers, our survey found.
Alex Harwin, October 20, 2020
6 min read
Liz Ogolo, 18, who is attending Harvard University this fall, said the transition to college was difficult without guidance from her high school, which switched to remote learning in the spring.
Liz Ogolo, 18, who is attending Harvard University this fall, said the transition to college was difficult without guidance from her high school, which switched to remote learning in the spring.
Angela Rowlings for Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Conflicting Messages Exacerbate Student Detours on the Road to College
Amid the many disruptions of the COVID-19 era, it’s more important than ever for educators to be consistent about the admissions requirements—and the costs—of college.
Sarah D. Sparks, October 20, 2020
7 min read
Magdalena Estiverne graduated from Evans High School in Orlando, Fla., this past spring during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Magdalena Estiverne graduated from Evans High School in Orlando, Fla., this past spring during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Eve Edelheit for Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Coping With Disruption at School and at Home
A 2020 high school graduate struggles to continue her education despite a disrupted senior year, a move to a new home, and spotty internet access.
Alex Harwin, October 20, 2020
3 min read
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Education Funding Opinion A Roadmap for Reparations in Education
Breaking the cycle of institutional racism includes a quality education for Black students, writes Khalilah M. Harris. Here’s how that could look.
Khalilah M. Harris, October 15, 2020
5 min read
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School & District Management Key Strategies for Steering Schools Through COVID-19
Here’s a recap of key findings for how to improve virtual learning, prioritize what to teach, make up for lost learning, and tend to students’ well-being.
Stephen Sawchuk, September 30, 2020
3 min read
Professional Development Anti-Racist Teaching: What Educators Really Think
A new nationally representative survey of teachers, principals, and district leaders offers key takeaways.
EdWeek Research Center, September 25, 2020
1 min read
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Illustration by Jamiel Law
Equity & Diversity 'Was I Part of the Problem?' A Journalist Studies Her Own Reporting on Race
Veteran reporter Debra Viadero invites researchers to scrutinize her decades of reporting for racial bias.
Debra Viadero, September 23, 2020
8 min read
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Illustration by Jamiel Law
Infrastructure Internet Access Is a Civil Rights Issue
In the world’s wealthiest country, why is broadband access denied to so many and in such high numbers? Mark Lieberman investigates.
Mark Lieberman, September 23, 2020
7 min read
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Illustration by Jamiel Law
Teacher Preparation Teachers Can Take on Anti-Racist Teaching. But Not Alone
Teachers want to do better by their students of color, but many don’t know how. Madeline Will examines the gap between intention and action.
Madeline Will, September 23, 2020
3 min read
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Illustration by Jamiel Law
Equity & Diversity Do America's Public Schools Owe Black People Reparations?
School districts must make amends for their racist history, writes Daarel Burnette II. What should that look like?
Daarel Burnette II, September 23, 2020
9 min read
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Illustration by Jamiel Law
Equity & Diversity Dismantling Systemic Racism in Schools: 8 Big Ideas
Get an overview of this fall’s Big Ideas special report, which is dedicated to addressing anti-Black systemic racism in schools.
Elizabeth Rich, September 23, 2020
4 min read