School & District Management News in Brief

School Reform Group Closes National Office

By Gina Cairney — January 08, 2013 1 min read

The Public Education Network has announced plans to close its national office in Washington after 21 years of working to ensure all children—especially minority and disadvantaged children—have access to quality education.

But PEN’s network of independent local education funds will continue working with school districts and communities in high-poverty areas.

The national office closed last month because its original goals have been met, and there’s no longer an “economic climate” to support such a membership organization, according to Amanda Broun, PEN’s former senior vice president.

The funds were created with support from the New York-based Ford Foundation in 1983 as a response to the landmark “A Nation at Risk” report to help reconnect the public with local schools.

PEN was formed in 1991 as a successor to that network. PEN and its independent organizations have worked to “affect policy, engage the public, and ensure that all children graduate ready for college and career,” Ms. Broun said.

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A version of this article appeared in the January 09, 2013 edition of Education Week as School Reform Group Closes National Office

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