Families & the Community News in Brief

‘Parent Trigger’ Row Resurfaces in Calif.

By Sean Cavanagh — August 28, 2012 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A California school board has approved a plan to restructure a school at the center of a closely watched “parent trigger” dispute, but it’s not the plan that a group of parents wanted—nor the plan they say a judge ordered.

The Adelanto, Calif., board voted Aug. 17 to accept a petition circulated by parents seeking to become the first in the country to use a parent-trigger law to overhaul an academically struggling school. But the panel rejected the parents’ preferred option, which was to convert Desert Trails Elementary into a charter school, the board’s president, Carlos Mendoza, told Education Week in an email. The board instead decided to move forward with a form of “alternate governance,” which would result in a longer school day, improved technology, and other changes.

The Adelanto board’s actions drew an immediate, angry reaction from the parents seeking to change the school. They said the panel has run afoul of a court decision issued last month, which in their view calls for the creation of a charter.

It’s likely the parents will go back to court to fight the Adelanto board’s decision, said Ben Austin, the executive director of Parent Revolution, a group that has helped them with the trigger effort.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the August 29, 2012 edition of Education Week as ‘Parent Trigger’ Row Resurfaces in Calif.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Academic Integrity in the Age of Artificial Intelligence
As AI writing tools rapidly evolve, learn how to set standards and expectations for your students on their use.
Content provided by Turnitin
Recruitment & Retention Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Chronic Teacher Shortage: Where Do We Go From Here?  
Join Peter DeWitt, Michael Fullan, and guests for expert insights into finding solutions for the teacher shortage.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
The Science of Reading: Tools to Build Reading Proficiency
The Science of Reading has taken education by storm. Learn how Dr. Miranda Blount transformed literacy instruction in her state.
Content provided by hand2mind

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Families & the Community Opinion Let's Pay Parents to Help With Learning Recovery
Schools would need to communicate clearly to parents about learning gaps and carefully direct their efforts, writes a policy director.
Chad Aldeman
4 min read
Illustration of a mother standing next to her son at the computer.
Alyona Zueva/iStock/Getty
Families & the Community How to Help Parents Understand Students' Academic Needs Post-Pandemic
Transparency and authentic engagement can get everyone on the same page.
3 min read
Families & the Community Why Aren’t Parents More Worried About Declines in Student Achievement?
Most parents think their students are doing OK, which could stymie districts’ recovery efforts.
6 min read
Image of a parent helping with homework at home.
E+
Families & the Community How to Respond to Parents' CRT Complaints
Four experts have advice for district leaders on how to craft their messages on diversity, equity, and inclusion lessons and initiatives.
5 min read
People protest outside the offices of the New Mexico Public Education Department's office on Nov. 12, 2021, in Albuquerque. The education department proposed changes to the social studies curriculum that critics describe as a veiled attempt to teach critical race theory. Supporters say the new curriculum, which includes ethnic studies, is "anti-racist."
People protest outside the offices of the New Mexico Public Education Department on Nov. 12, 2021, in Albuquerque. The protesters were reacting to proposed changes to the social studies curriculum that they said were a veiled attempt to teach critical race theory.
Cedar Attanasio/AP