Opinion
Families & the Community Letter to the Editor

Learning Is Still Happening at Home

April 28, 2020 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

To the Editor:

I was a little disappointed to see the recent subheadline, “Not every parent can keep the learning going” (“Will the Learning Gap Widen as Schools Stay Closed?”, April 1, 2020).

In the traditional academic sense, that’s true. But parents can keep the learning going in terms of career exploration, workplace literacy, and giving their students an unprecedented look at how crucial it is to adapt and be flexible in times of crisis. Schools have ostensibly been preparing students for the realities of adult life. One of those realities is work. And, while it may not be the rosiest of conversations, never have the realities of work been more in the conversational zeitgeist than they have been today. We’re doing our students a real disservice if we continue to focus on what can’t be done at home and not on the real-world lessons emerging all around them: Students are seeing what it’s like to make unplanned career pivots, juggle work and family life, and how to deal with the unexpected. I’m aware the situation isn’t ideal.

I’m aware of the inequities this pandemic is exposing. But I believe it’ll be more harmful in the long run to bemoan the ways students can’t learn from home than capitalize on the ways they can. The learning happening now may not be the traditional learning students are used to, but taking advantage is better than fretting. I’d love for you to focus less on what we can’t do and more on what we can.

Pat Brothwell

Writer

Asheville, N.C.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the April 29, 2020 edition of Education Week as Learning Is Still Happening at Home

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Strategies for Improving Student Outcomes with Teacher-Student Relationships
Explore strategies for strengthening teacher-student relationships and hear how districts are putting these methods into practice to support positive student outcomes.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Transform Teaching and Learning with AI
Increase productivity and support innovative teaching with AI in the classroom.
Content provided by Promethean
Curriculum Webinar Computer Science Education Movement Gathers Momentum. How Should Schools React?
Discover how schools can expand opportunities for students to study computer science education.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Families & the Community How Teachers Can Build Productive Relationships With Families
Advice for early-career teachers on working with students' parents and families.
6 min read
Image of a teacher interacting with a family.
Laura Baker/Education Week and iStock/Getty
Families & the Community Opinion How to Make Parent Engagement Meaningful
Parents can serve as valuable education resources for their children—and teachers.
4 min read
family remote ed Opinion
Feodora Chiosea/iStock/Getty
Families & the Community Republicans' Confidence in Public Schools Plummets, Gallup Poll Finds
Republicans' confidence in public schools dropped more sharply than Democrats', the latest Gallup poll finds.
3 min read
Image of a small U.S. flag in a pencil case.
iStock/Getty
Families & the Community How Can Parents Best Support Teachers? We Asked
We asked educators on social media to share the most helpful ways families can support their work.
3 min read
Illustration of a parent and child outside of a school building.
E+/Getty