Recruitment & Retention

Nice Work If You Can Get It ...

By Anthony Rebora — March 12, 2008 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Teachers working in refurbished high schools in North Carolina have a greater sense of job satisfaction than their peers in traditional high schools in the state, according to a recent study by the Center for Teaching Quality.

The study looked at more than 50 high schools that, with the help of an $11 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, were either newly created as early-college high schools or redesigned to provide smaller learning communities.

The researchers found that teachers in these schools were significantly more positive than other teachers when asked about issues of trust and support, teacher-empowerment, and collaboration in their schools. They were also more likely to find value and relevance in their professional development activities.

The study suggests that the smaller layout of these schools, coupled with clearly conceived and communicated academic programs, gave the teachers a stronger sense of community and shared goals.

Read “Teaching and Learning Conditions Improve High School Reform Efforts”

A version of this article appeared in the March 01, 2008 edition of Teacher PD Sourcebook

Events

English-Language Learners Webinar The Science of Reading and Multilingual Learners: What Educators Need to Know
Join experts in reading science and multilingual literacy to discuss what the latest research means for multilingual learners in classrooms adopting a science of reading-based approach.
School & District Management K-12 Essentials Forum Get a Strong Start to the New School Year
Get insights and actions from Education Week journalists and expert guests on how to start the new school year on strong footing.
Reading & Literacy Webinar A Roadmap to Multisensory Early Literacy Instruction: Accelerate Growth for All Students 
How can you develop key literacy skills with a diverse range of learners? Explore best practices and tips to meet the needs of all students. 

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Recruitment & Retention Spotlight Spotlight on Teacher Retention
This Spotlight will help you investigate how schools can hold onto valued staff, learn how to build a healthier school culture, and more.
Recruitment & Retention From Our Research Center The Outlook Is Bad for School Hiring This Fall
A survey shows most schools aren't getting enough teacher, bus driver, paraprofessional, and other job candidates.
2 min read
Illustration of job applicant and missing puzzle pieces.
wildpixel/Getty<br/><br/>
Recruitment & Retention From Our Research Center After-School Programs Face Perfect Storm of Staffing and Funding Problems, Survey Finds
Staffing shortages come at a critical time, as schools are looking for more assistance helping students recover academically.
6 min read
A student juggles a soccer ball on a playground amid the COVID-19 pandemic at Washington Elementary School Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022, in Lynwood, Calif. California is making it easier for school districts to hire teachers and other employees amid staffing shortages brought on by the latest surge in coronavirus cases.
A student juggles a soccer ball on a playground at Washington Elementary School in Lynwood, Calif. Schools and outside organizations are struggling to find workers to oversee after-school programs, which provide crucial opportunities for social-emotional support and homework help for students.
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Recruitment & Retention Letter to the Editor A Note of Appreciation
A retired administrator shares why it's so important to appreciate colleagues in this letter to the editor.
1 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty