School & District Management

‘New Leaders’ Group to License Principals in N.C.

By Lesli A. Maxwell — December 10, 2008 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

New Leaders for New Schools, a national nonprofit organization that recruits and grooms principals to serve in high-poverty schools, announced today that next year it will begin training leaders in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., district.

At the same time, leaders with the New York City-based group announced that the North Carolina board of education had approved a new policy to allow its principal-trainees to become licensed by the state without having to go through a university-based training program. That arrangement—which was a key factor in Charlotte’s success in attracting New Leaders—is similar to principal-licensure agreements that the organization already has with state departments of education in Maryland, Tennessee, Louisiana, and Wisconsin.

The 137,000-student Charlotte-Mecklenburg district is the 10th to partner with New Leaders since the organization was founded in 2000 and started training its first class of principals a year later. Charlotte was selected from a pool of more than 20 districts whose education and civic leaders sought to bring New Leaders to their cities next year, said Jackie Gran, the national director for growth and policy for the organization.

Ms. Gran said strong district leadership in Superintendent Peter C. Gorman and Charlotte’s supportive corporate and philanthropic community also gave the city an edge over other applicants.

“We know that a great superintendent is essential and that for this partnership to be a successful, long-term endeavor, you’ve got to have great local engagement,” Ms. Gran said. “Charlotte-Mecklenburg has both.”

The addition of Charlotte-Mecklenburg to New Leaders’ portfolio moves the organization toward its goal of working in as many as 15 urban districts within the next six years. In addition, the group aims to have, on average, one-third of each of those district’s schools run by one of its principals, said Jon Schnur, the chief executive officer.

“We are making the bet that Charlotte has very good prospects to become a city that can be a proof point that kids at all income levels can learn at high levels when the conditions are right,” said Mr. Schnur, who co-founded New Leaders.

The organization plans to recruit, train, and place roughly 50 principals in Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools over the next five years, Ms. Gran said. Training for the first group will start in June. New Leaders also works in Baltimore, Chicago, the District of Columbia, Memphis, Tenn., Milwaukee, New Orleans, New York City, Prince George’s County, Md., and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Related Tags:

Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management Educators' Support for COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Is Rising Dramatically
Nearly 60 percent of educators say students who are old enough to receive COVID vaccines should be required to get them to attend school.

4 min read
Mariah Vaughn, a 15-year-old Highland Park student, prepares to receive a COVID-19 vaccine during the vaccine clinic at Topeka High School on Monday, Aug. 9, 2021.
Mariah Vaughn, 15, a student at Highland Park High School in Topeka, Kan., prepares to receive a COVID-19 vaccine at her school in August.
Evert Nelson/The Topeka Capital-Journal via AP
School & District Management 10 Ways to Tackle Education's Urgent Challenges
As the school year gets underway, we ask hard questions about education’s biggest challenges and offer some solutions.
2 min read
Conceptual Image of schools preparing for the pandemic
Pep Montserrat for Education Week
School & District Management Reported Essay Principals Need Social-Emotional Support, Too
By overlooking the well-being of their school leaders, districts could limit how much their schools can flourish.
7 min read
Conceptual Illustration
Pep Montserrat for Education Week
School & District Management From Our Research Center Educator Stress, Anti-Racism, and Pandemic Response: How You're Feeling
A new nationally representative survey offers key takeaways from teachers, principals, and district leaders.
EdWeek Research Center
1 min read
2021 BI COVER no text DATA crop
Pep Montserrat for Education Week