Families & the Community News in Brief

L.A. Drafts Procedures for ‘Parent Trigger’

By Katie Ash — September 17, 2013 1 min read
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For the first time since California’s controversial parent-trigger law was passed two years ago, Los Angeles parents and staff now have guidelines from the Los Angeles Unified School District’s board to help them navigate the complex process.

The law allows some low-performing schools to be overhauled if a majority of parent signatures can be collected.

The guidance requires schools affected by parent-trigger efforts to hold public meetings to present a range of information about the school to community members.

The document also specifies that school employees cannot interfere with or impede the signature-gathering process using district resources such as copiers, paper, or bulletin boards. Furthermore, staff may not distribute flyers, leaflets, or other materials on campus or during work hours.

A version of this article appeared in the September 18, 2013 edition of Education Week as L.A. Drafts Procedures For ‘Parent Trigger’

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