School & District Management

Gates Analysis Offers Clues to Identification of Teacher Effectiveness

By Stephen Sawchuk — January 11, 2011 4 min read

“Value added” gauges based on growth in student test scores and students’ perceptions of their teachers both hold promise as components of a system for identifying and promoting teacher effectiveness, according to preliminary findings from the first year of a major study.

The analysis, released last month by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, shows that teachers’ value-added histories were among the strongest predictors of how they would perform in other classrooms or school years—as were students’ perceptions of their teachers’ ability to maintain order and provide challenging lessons.

The findings are part of the Seattle-based foundation’s $45 million Measure of Effective Teaching study, which seeks to identify accurate measures of superior teaching. (“Multi-City Study Eyes Best Gauges of Good Teaching,” Sept. 2, 2009.)

While underscoring the preliminary nature of the findings, Gates officials said they were heartened to see that several measures being studied do appear predictive of good teaching.

“I was hugely excited and encouraged” by the findings, said Vicki Phillips, the foundation’s director of education programs. “It has implications for what people can be doing right now. It begins to answer questions teachers have had. And I think it shows that valid teacher feedback doesn’t need to be limited to test scores alone.”

Among its education philanthropy, the Gates Foundation provides grant support to Editorial Projects in Education, the publisher of Education Week.

Complex Studies

The preliminary findings are based on data from five of the six districts participating in the study. They are New York City; Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C.; Hillsborough County, Fla; Dallas; and Denver.

A team of researchers directed by Thomas J. Kane, the foundation’s deputy director of education research and data, analyzed student scores on state tests given in grades 4-8 in the 2009-10 school year, using value-added modeling.

Such modeling purports to control for a student’s past performance and other factors so that learning gains can be attributed to specific teachers.

The researchers also analyzed student-perception data gathered from 2,519 classrooms, grades 4-8. Students rated teachers on a 1-to-5 scale on such aspects as whether teachers made the point of their lessons clear, were considerate of students, and explained material in several different ways.

The analysts found that, in every grade and subject studied, teachers’ value-added histories were strongly predictive of their performance in other classrooms. While such estimates exhibit a degree of volatility in the estimates from year to year, that volatility “is not so large as to undercut the usefulness of value-added as an indicator of future performance,” the study says.

Similarly, the researchers found that student perceptions of a given teacher were generally consistent across his or her classes, and that students gave high ratings to teachers whose classes consistently made learning gains.

In particular, student perceptions of teachers’ ability to manage a classroom and provide challenging academic content were strongly linked to those teachers’ ability to raise scores.

One of the study’s findings appears to complicate the conventional wisdom that teachers can boost scores by “teaching to the test.”

The analysis found that the value-added estimates of teacher effectiveness held up even when students were given supplemental tests with harder tasks less subject to test preparation than those on the state tests, including conceptual questions and open-ended writing tasks.

Meanwhile, student reports of classes spent heavily on test preparation were generally weaker predictors of teachers’ ability to raise scores than other factors, though the study did find a positive relationship between test preparation and teacher value-added estimates.

Combining Results

The value-added findings, in particular, come in the midst of a divisive debate in the K-12 field about whether such methods should count in a teacher’s evaluation.

The Gates Foundation’s findings on student perceptions, in the meantime, raise new questions for states and districts. Spurred by federal grant programs, some states have moved toward including teacher observations and even value-added methods in evaluations. Far fewer, however, are considering student-perception data.

So far, the study also appears to support the notion, advocated by teachers’ unions and others, that evaluations should be based on multiple measures. The analysis concludes that combining both sources of information—value-added and student feedback—yielded a more finely grained estimate of teacher effectiveness than using the student-perception information alone.

One key area not yet studied is the accuracy of teacher-observation ratings on a variety of teaching frameworks. The foundation’s research partners are still collecting and scoring videotaped observations of some 13,000 lessons in 2009-10 as part of that effort.

Other measures under study include teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge and their perceptions of their working conditions.

Gates officials plan to release a second report next spring. It will begin to examine the results of an experiment, already under way, to gauge student performance when students are randomly assigned to teachers identified as being more or less effective. Final results will be released in the winter of 2011-12.

“Things we’ve intuitively known, or thought about, or wished for about teacher effectiveness—there’s now some empirical evidence that they are valid,” Ms. Phillips said.

A version of this article appeared in the January 12, 2011 edition of Education Week as Gates Analysis Offers Clues to Identification of Teacher Effectiveness

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
How Principals Can Support Student Well-Being During COVID
Join this webinar for tips on how to support and prioritize student health and wellbeing during COVID.
Content provided by Unruly Studios
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Building Leadership Excellence Through Instructional Coaching
Join this webinar for a discussion on instructional coaching and ways you can link your implement or build on your program.
Content provided by Whetstone Education/SchoolMint
Teaching Webinar Tips for Better Hybrid Learning: Ask the Experts What Works
Register and ask your questions about hybrid learning to our expert panel.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Strategic Account Manager
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association
President and CEO
Alexandria, Virginia
National Association of State Boards of Education
CCLC Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools
CCLC Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools

Read Next

School & District Management Opinion Will the Hybrid School Concept Continue After COVID?
In an effort to move from triage to transformation, schools should look at how they continue the hybrid model after the COVID vaccine.
7 min read
Image shows a speech bubble divided into 4 overlapping, connecting parts.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty and Laura Baker/Education Week
School & District Management New York City's Equity-Minded Schools Chief Resigns
Richard A. Carranza, the chancellor of the New York City schools, announced Feb. 26 he will step down from the job next month.
4 min read
Richard Carranza, Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, arrives to Public School 188 The Island School as students arrive for in-person classes, on, Sept. 29, 2020, in the Manhattan borough of New York.
Richard A. Carranza announced he will depart the top New York City schools job in March.
John Minchillo/AP
School & District Management Opinion New Resource Tracks School System Reopening
The Return to Learn Tracker identifies the current instructional model of all regular public school districts with three or more schools.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
School & District Management San Francisco School Board Pauses Renaming 44 Schools, Promises to Consult Historians
The renaming of 44 schools in the San Francisco Unified School District is apparently being put on hold after intense blowback.
Greg Keraghosian
1 min read
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.<br/><br/>
Jeff Chiu/AP