Special Report
School & District Management

10 Game-Changing Ideas in Education

By The Editors — January 10, 2018 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

We went looking for big ideas in K-12 schooling: trends, disruptions, practices, or technologies that could help solve some of the field’s biggest challenges.

Here’s the result: 10 innovative ideas from researchers, educators, scientists, and advocates that could make a difference to those on the frontlines of K-12 education. Some of the problems they address are as old as public schooling itself; others have a new and growing sense of urgency.

Presented in no particular order, they are meant to stir conversation or prompt you to think about your work in a new way.

Let us know what you think or if we missed any by tweeting us, using #K12BigIdeas.

No. 1: Memory is the key to student engagement.

Bestselling authors (and brothers) Chip Heath and Dan Heath argue that “peak moments” capture “delight,” offering “a different kind of learning that sticks with students and motivates them to succeed.” Read more.

No. 2: Tackle the teacher-diversity problem. Re-examine teacher preparation.

Teacher-prep programs need to reconsider their practices, and they could learn a lot from minority-serving institutions, writes Cassandra Herring, founder of BranchED and the former ed. school dean at Hampton University. Read more.

No. 3: Stop expecting parents to engage without showing them how.

Parents don’t always know how to advocate for their child’s education. EdNavigator’s Whitney Henderson, the child of a single mom, is working to change that. Read more.

No. 4: There’s a tech solution to creating a master schedule.

A school’s master schedule can take months to build and can contribute to education inequities. Adam Pisoni, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur, has a better way. Read more.

No. 5: Students don’t need grades.

It’s time to reimagine a classroom where students are driven by curiosity rather than a score, writes educator and author Mark Barnes. Read more.

No. 6: School districts can dramatically reduce student homelessness.

To tackle student homelessness, schools must tap into their broader community’s resources, writes Colorado’s state coordinator for homeless education. Read more.

No. 7: Bridge the gap between mindset research and practice.

The research behind growth mindset and grit is familiar to many educators, but when misrepresented, can be harmful. The executive director of the Mindset Scholars Network explains. Read more.

No. 8: Fight the Opioid Epidemic at Its Source.

The strain that a crisis of addiction places on schools will continue—unless we break the cycle. Todd Hembree, attorney general of the Cherokee Nation, took dramatic action to stem the flow of opioids into his community. Read more.

No. 9: Artificial Intelligence is on the rise. Schools have a role to play.

What do educators need to know to prepare students for the future of artificial intelligence? Two AI researchers from the Allen Institute get into it. Read more.

No. 10: Civics education is no longer just happening in the classroom.

To solve some of our biggest challenges, young people must be inspired to act, argues David Simas, the CEO of the Obama Foundation. Read more.

Bonus!

In addition to soliciting ideas, we also surveyed educators to see where they hear about trends and new ideas that could be worth pursuing in their classroom. Here are the results.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Assessment Webinar
The State of Assessment in K-12 Education
What is the impact of assessment on K-12 education? What does that mean for administrators, teachers and most importantly—students?
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Centering the Whole Child in School Improvement Planning and Redesign
Learn how leading with equity and empathy yield improved sense of belonging, attendance, and promotion rate to 10th grade.

Content provided by Panorama
Teaching Profession Webinar Examining the Evidence: Supports to Promote Teacher Well-Being
Rates of work dissatisfaction are on the rise among teachers. Grappling with an increased workload due to the pandemic and additional stressors have exacerbated feelings of burnout and demoralization. Given these challenges, what can the

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management New Survey: How the Pandemic Has Made School Leadership More Stressful
Secondary school principals have reported frequent job-related stress, especially concerns about staff and student well-being.
6 min read
Illustration of figure at the center of many incoming arrows
nerosu/iStock/Getty Images
School & District Management From Principals, a Primer on Delivering Bad News
COVID and the upheavals of the last two years have raised the ante on often-emotional conversations with staff and parents.
9 min read
Conceptual image of balanced weighing the pros and cons.
Cagkan Sayin/iStock
School & District Management Opinion If You Can’t Maintain an Initiative, Maybe You Shouldn’t Do It
Schools are often really good at finding new initiatives to implement but aren't always good at maintaining. Here's a model to consider.
5 min read
Screen Shot 2022 01 21 at 7.57.56 AM
Shutterstock
School & District Management Schools Are Desperate for Substitutes and Getting Creative
Now in the substitute-teacher pool: parents, college students, and the National Guard.
10 min read
Zackery Kimball, a substitute teacher at Bailey Middle School, works with two classes of students at the school's theater hall on Friday, Dec. 10, 2021, in Las Vegas. Many schools have vacant teaching and/or support staff jobs and no available substitutes to cover day-to-day absences.
Zackery Kimball, a substitute teacher at Bailey Middle School in Las Vegas, works with two classes of students at the school's theater hall on a Friday in December 2021.
Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP