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"Reading From Paper Compared to Screens: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis"

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A meta-analysis of nearly three-dozen research studies published over the past decade finds that reading from paper has a small, statistically significant benefit on reading performance.

One likely reason: Readers using screens tend to think they're processing and understanding texts better then they actually are.

Furthermore, according to University of North Dakota assistant education professor Virginia Clinton, readers using paper saw better performance without having to expend more time or effort. Her findings were presented at the American Educational Research Association this month.

Vol. 38, Issue 29, Page 5

Published in Print: April 17, 2019, as Reading
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