Opinion
Education Letter to the Editor

Should Schools Be Paying for National Spelling Bee?

April 07, 2008 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

To the Editor:

Regarding the most recent developments in “Spelling Gate,” the furor over a National Spelling Bee participant’s disqualification because of a problem with her school’s submission of paperwork, as reported by the Associated Press and featured on your Web site, edweek.org, March 24, 2008:

According to public disclosures, Kenneth W. Lowe, the president and chief executive officer of E.W. Scripps Co., which is the National Spelling Bee’s sponsor, is personally being compensated $9.92 million per year. Richard A. Boehne, the company’s chief operating officer and executive vice president, receives $2.67 million. And the amounts being paid each year to the rest of the key executives are equally impressive.

Yet, this self-proclaimed “not-for-profit” spelling bee claims to have no choice but to charge schools $99 to participate in this event?

While the for-profit Scripps deserves credit for being the official parent organization of the spelling bee, it is undeniably in the company’s best interest to keep the bee as accessible and favorably publicized as possible.

The event’s director, Paige Kimball, has publicly set the annual cost of the Bee at $2.5 million.

Good Lord, the CEO alone could pay for this entire event, (without a cent from the schools or anyone else), and still clear more than $7 million a year!

After the publicity that Scripps has gotten lately, I bet he wishes he had.

Lorna Taylor

Olathe, Kan.

More letters to the editor.

A version of this article appeared in the April 09, 2008 edition of Education Week as Should Schools Be Paying For National Spelling Bee?

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Law & Courts Webinar
Future of the First Amendment: Exploring Trends in High School Students’ Views of Free Speech
Learn how educators are navigating student free speech issues and addressing controversial topics like gender and race in the classroom.
Content provided by The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Real-World Problem Solving: How Invention Education Drives Student Learning
Hear from student inventors and K-12 teachers about how invention education enhances learning, opens minds, and preps students for the future.
Content provided by The Lemelson Foundation

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: June 8, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: June 1, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: May 11, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: April 27, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read