Education

For Your Students

August 01, 2002 4 min read
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Following are application dates for student contests, scholarships, and internships. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

*Early Fall GOVERNMENT
The United States Senate Youth Program, funded by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, selects 104 high school juniors and seniors for a trip to Washington, D.C., to study the branches of national government. Each winner also receives a $5,000 college scholarship. To apply, elected student- government officers take state qualifying tests. Two winners from each state, the District of Columbia, and the Department of Defense schools overseas are selected for the weeklong trip in March. Deadlines for the test vary by state. Contact: Hearst Foundation, (800) 841-7048; www.ussenateyouth.org.

*Early Fall SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
The FIRST LEGO League, sponsored by the LEGO Group and FIRST, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring students in math, science, and technology, invites 9- to 14-year-olds to participate in its annual team tournaments. Groups of seven to 10 students and an adult coach have approximately eight weeks to build, program, and test a fully autonomous robot capable of completing various “missions.” A $150 team registration fee is required by Sept. 30. Teams can enter local events or state tournaments where they are rewarded for excellence in teamwork, problem-solving, creativity, design, strategy, and leadership. At FLL state tournaments, every participant receives a medal, and judges present 13 team honors, including the prestigious Director’s Award. For more information about how to start a team, contact: FIRST, (800) 871-8326; e-mail fll@usfirst.org; www.usfirst.org.

*August 23 ART
The Department of Defense’s Deployment Health Clinical Center at Walter Reed Army Medical Center seeks submissions of original artwork for its 2002 “Reflections on Hope and Courage Art Contest,” an outlet for expression post-Sept. 11. The contest is open to 6- to 18-year-olds who are the children of reserve, active duty, or retired military personnel; Department of Defense or federal government employees; firefighters; police officers; or emergency medical-response workers. One winner from each age group—6-8, 9-12, 13-15, and 16-18—is awarded a trip to Disney World. Cash prizes of $500, $250, and $125 also are awarded. The winning entries will be celebrated during the closing ceremonies of the Deployment Health Clinical Center’s conference in Alexandria, Va., to remember the heroes of Sept. 11, 2001. Contact: DHCC Art Contest, P.O. Box 59667, Washington, DC 20012; (202) 782-8937; www.PDHealth.mil.

*September 25 ATHLETICS
The Wendy’s High School Heisman Award recognizes students who demonstrate scholarship, citizenship, and athletic ability. Schools can nominate two seniors—one boy and one girl. Officials from Wendy’s fast-food chain and the CTB/McGraw-Hill book company select 1,020 state finalists and 102 state winners. Twelve students are selected as national finalists and receive a trip to New York City for the Heisman Awards ceremony, where one male and one female finalist are named the Wendy’s High School Heisman National Award winners and are recognized in a televised ceremony. Contact: Wendy’s International, (800) 244-5161; fax (614) 760-2090; www.wendyshighschoolheisman.com.

*October 1 ART
The National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts announces its Arts Recognition and Talent Search Program, open to high school seniors or artists ages 17 and 18 who do not live in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, or Wisconsin. (Applicants in those states must enter through a regional program.) The foundation selects 125 students, who travel to Miami for workshops and auditions; receive hotel accommodations, meals, and ground transportation; and get cash awards ranging from $100 to $3,000. About 20 artists are named Presidential Scholars in the Arts and are honored at the White House. Awards are based on merit in one of nine art forms. Applicants pay a $30 to $40 entry fee. For more information, contact: National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, (800) 970-2787; www.artsawards.org.

*October 1 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
The Siemens Westinghouse Competition in math, science, and technology is open to high school students who are U.S. citizens or legal residents. Applicants working individually or in teams of two or three submit original research projects in science, mathematics, engineering, or technology. Sponsored by the Siemens Foundation, the contest awards more than $1 million in scholarships. Top prize for an individual entry is a $100,000 scholarship; the winning team splits a $100,000 scholarship. For more information, contact: Siemens Westinghouse Competition, Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6730, Princeton, NJ 08541; (877) 822-5233; www.siemens-foundation.org.

—Leah Kerkman

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