Executive Skills & Strategy Report Roundup

Research Report: Teaching

By Benjamin Herold — June 11, 2019 1 min read
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Forty percent of what elementary school teachers do on a typical workday could be automated by 2030, predicts a new report by the McKinsey Global Institute.

The group modeled scenarios and examined the economies of 10 developed countries including the United States. It predicts 40 million to 160 million people will need to transition to new or altered jobs by 2030. As robots and artificial intelligence take over some of the routine tasks now done by humans, teachers—80 percent of whom are women—will need to develop new skills and become more comfortable collaborating with algorithmic systems, the report says.

A version of this article appeared in the June 12, 2019 edition of Education Week as Teaching

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