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Publishers Get Poor Marks on Common-Core Math Texts

By Liana Loewus — July 19, 2016 1 min read
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The curriculum-review website EdReports.org has released its first round of results for high school math textbooks, and three of the major publishers performed poorly.

Textbooks from the College Board, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and Pearson all failed to meet the expectations for being considered aligned to the Common Core State Standards. A program by Carnegie Learning partially met expectations. Of the five programs reviewed, only a math textbook by CPM Educational Program was found to be fully aligned to the common core.

Pearson said the evaluations “continue to be plagued by inaccuracies, misunderstandings of program instructional models, misinterpretations” of the standards’ expectations, “and a lack of understanding of effective curriculum development and pedagogy.”

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A version of this article appeared in the July 20, 2016 edition of Education Week as Publishers Get Poor Marks on Common-Core Math Texts

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