College

Twin brothers John and Jonathan Easter walk together in their hometown of Bradley, Ark. a few weeks before they are going to begin college on July 30, 2021.
Twin brothers John and Jonathan Easter walk together in their hometown of Bradley, Ark. a few weeks before they are going to begin college on July 30, 2021.
April Kirby/For Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Video Resilience, Faith, and Support: How Twin Brothers Forged Diverging Paths to College
Twin brothers from rural Arkansas reflect on their path to college in the midst of the pandemic.
Brooke Saias, September 21, 2021
1 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion Can College-Going Be Less Risky Without Being 'Free'?
Rick Hess speaks with Peter Samuelson, president of Ardeo Education Solutions, about Ardeo's approach to make paying for college less risky.
Rick Hess, August 25, 2021
5 min read
In this Nov. 10, 2020 photo the sun rises behind the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court seemed concerned Tuesday, Dec. 1, about the impact of siding with food giants Nestle and Cargill and ending a lawsuit that claims they knowingly bought cocoa beans from farms in Africa that used child slave labor. The court was hearing arguments in the case by phone because of the coronavirus pandemic.
The U.S. Supreme Court is still weighing whether to hear a case challenging Harvard University's race-conscious admissions policies.
Alex Brandon/AP
Law & Courts High Court Asks Biden Administration Views on Harvard Affirmative Action in Admissions
Some had expected U.S. Supreme Court justices to jump at the chance to reconsider the practices in education, but that's delayed for now.
Mark Walsh, June 14, 2021
3 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion An Economist Explains How to Make College Pay
Rick Hess speaks with Beth Akers about practical advice regarding how to choose a college, what to study, and how to pay for it.
Rick Hess, June 10, 2021
6 min read
Conceptual image of blocks moving forward, and one moving backward.
Marchmeena29/iStock/Getty
College & Workforce Readiness What the Research Says College Enrollment Dip Hits Students of Color the Hardest
The pandemic led to a precipitous decline in enrollment for two-year schools, while four-year colleges and universities held steady.
Sarah D. Sparks, June 3, 2021
3 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion There’s Insurance for Homes or Cars—Why Not College Degrees?
Rick Hess talks with Wade Eyerly, the CEO of Degree Insurance, about the company's plan to make investing in a college degree less risky.
Rick Hess, April 29, 2021
7 min read
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Law & Courts Supreme Court Sympathetic to College Athletes' Challenge to NCAA Rules on Education Aid
The justices weighed a case about the definition of amateurism in college athletics that may trickle down to high school and youth sports.
Mark Walsh, March 31, 2021
6 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion Straight Up Conversation: The Guy Who's Teaching Professors to Teach
I recently chatted with ACUE president Jonathan Gyurko about his organization's efforts to teach professors to be excellent educators, not just subject-matter experts.
Rick Hess, June 25, 2020
13 min read
School & District Management Student Cheating at Issue as College Board Rolls Out Online AP Exams
The College Board's national experiment with virtual AP exams gets underway this week amid accusations and stern warnings about student cheating.
Gabrielle Wanneh, May 12, 2020
3 min read
High school senior Alexis Campbell of Fayetteville, Ga., visited George Washington University in Washington before the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to shut down live, on-campus tours for prospective students. Now she is considering whether to enroll in a school closer to home in the fall.
High school senior Alexis Campbell of Fayetteville, Ga., visited George Washington University in Washington before the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to shut down live, on-campus tours for prospective students. Now she is considering whether to enroll in a school closer to home in the fall.
Courtesy of Alexis Campbell
Classroom Technology 'Summer Melt' Could Be a Flood as Seniors Shift College Plans
Faced with uncertainty, new financial concerns, and the prospect of more remote learning, and confusion, a growing number of college-bound high school seniors are reconsidering where and whether they’ll pursue higher education.
Gabrielle Wanneh, April 24, 2020
6 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Students Petition Colleges for SAT and ACT Flexibility Due to Coronavirus
Worried that coronavirus testing disruptions will harm their college applications, a coalition of student groups is calling on colleges and universities to accept applications without SAT or ACT scores when application season starts up again next fall.
Catherine Gewertz, March 23, 2020
2 min read
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Dilen_ua/Getty & Vanessa Solis/Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion Not Every Student Should Go to College. And That's OK
We should understand when going to college for the wrong reasons is worse than not going at all, write Michael B. Horn and Bob Moesta.
Michael B. Horn & Bob Moesta, March 10, 2020
5 min read
Special Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of short news stories from this week.
January 21, 2020
7 min read
Federal What the FAFSA Simplification Trump Signed Means for Students
The cumbersome process of applying for federal student aid will be a bit easier after President Trump signed a bill that simplifies the FAFSA form Thursday.
Evie Blad, December 19, 2019
5 min read