Science News in Brief

Wyoming Churches Support Common Science Standards

By Liana Loewus — July 08, 2014 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A group of churches in Wyoming has endorsed the Next Generation Science Standards, including the stance that evolution should be taught as scientific fact.

Wyoming blocked adoption of the common science standards in March. The backlash has been, at least in part, a result of the document’s language on evolution and human contributions to global warming.

But a statement from the Wyoming Association of Churches—a group representing 10 Protestant denominations—says: “Wac believes that God gave us the responsibility to serve as stewards of the created order. Science, on the other hand, is not based upon a belief system but rather a field of study dedicated to the understanding of how the created order works. Therefore, WAC strongly supports the advancement of an education system founded upon 21st-century evidence-based science standards.”

A version of this article appeared in the July 10, 2014 edition of Education Week as Wyoming Churches Support Common Science Standards

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Your Questions on the Science of Reading, Answered
Dive into the Science of Reading with K-12 leaders. Discover strategies, policy insights, and more in our webinar.
Content provided by Otus
Mathematics Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Breaking the Cycle: How Districts are Turning around Dismal Math Scores
Math myth: Students just aren't good at it? Join us & learn how districts are boosting math scores.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
How To Tackle The Biggest Hurdles To Effective Tutoring
Learn how districts overcome the three biggest challenges to implementing high-impact tutoring with fidelity: time, talent, and funding.
Content provided by Saga Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Science Download DIY Ideas for Safe Eclipse Viewing (Downloadable)
Here's a guide to safe, do-it-yourself ways to view next month's total eclipse, in or out of school.
1 min read
Image of a colander casting a shadow on a white paper as one way to view the eclipse using a household item.
iStock/Getty and Canva
Science Q&A How Schools Can Turn the Solar Eclipse Into an Unforgettable Science Lesson
The once-in-a-lifetime event can pique students' interest in science.
6 min read
A billboard heralding the upcoming total solar eclipse that Erie will experience is shown in Erie, Pa., on March 22, 2024.
A billboard heralding the upcoming total solar eclipse that Erie will experience is shown in Erie, Pa., on March 22, 2024.
Gene J. Puskar/AP
Science Letter to the Editor A Call to Action for Revitalizing STEM Education
An educational consultant and former educator discusses the importance of STEM education in this letter to the editor.
1 min read
Education Week opinion letters submissions
Gwen Keraval for Education Week
Science Opinion The Solar Eclipse Is Coming. How to Make It a Learning Opportunity
The value of students observing this dramatic celestial phenomenon for themselves should be obvious, write two science educators.
Dennis Schatz & Andrew Fraknoi
3 min read
Tyler Hanson, of Fort Rucker, Ala., watches the sun moments before the total eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (John Minchillo/AP) Illustrated with a solar eclipse cycle superimposed.
Education Week + John Minchillo/AP + iStock/Getty Images