Science News in Brief

U.S. Teenagers Cite Value of Math, Science

November 16, 2010 1 min read

Nearly all American teenagers recognize the importance of math and science, and most are confident in their own abilities in the subjects, a new survey of U.S. youths suggests.

At the same time, however, teenagers are far less confident in the nation’s ability to be competitive in mathematics and science, according to an Intel Corp.-commissioned, online survey of 1,000 U.S. teenagers. Asked which country is best at math and science, 90 percent of the youths chose a country other than the United States; 67 percent selected Japan or China. Some said Americans don’t work hard enough and lack discipline.

A clear majority of the teenagers, 68 percent, agreed that math and science know-how will be required of most jobs in the future, and 58 percent said they aspire to a math- or science-related career.

On the global question, “How important do you think it is to be good at math and science?”, 99 percent said it was either “very important” (68 percent) or “somewhat important” (31 percent). Fifty-nine percent agreed that math and science are “important for me to get into college,” but only 44 percent viewed it as important to “solving society’s big problems.”

The “geek” stigma also lingers: Only 4 percent of respondents agreed that math and science is “an area cool people tend to be good at.” The gender gap remains, as well: A greater percentage of males (89 percent) said they were confident in their abilities in science and math than did females (79 percent). Forty-nine percent of males were “very confident” compared with 36 percent of females.

“These findings raise a lot of questions,” said Shelly Esque, Intel’s vice president for legal and corporate affairs. “Are teens overconfident? Or is it that they are not being challenged enough?”

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the November 17, 2010 edition of Education Week as U.S. Teenagers Cite Value of Math, Science

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Building Leadership Excellence Through Instructional Coaching
Join this webinar for a discussion on instructional coaching and ways you can link your implement or build on your program.
Content provided by Whetstone Education/SchoolMint
Teaching Webinar Tips for Better Hybrid Learning: Ask the Experts What Works
Register and ask your questions about hybrid learning to our expert panel.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
Family Engagement for Student Success With Dr. Karen Mapp
Register for this free webinar to learn how to empower and engage families for student success featuring Karen L. Mapp.
Content provided by Panorama Education & PowerMyLearning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Washington Teacher Trainer - (WAVA)
Washington, United States
K12 Inc.
Strategic Account Manager
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association
President and CEO
Alexandria, Virginia
National Association of State Boards of Education
CCLC Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools

Read Next

Science Opinion Ten Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies for the Science Classroom
Four teachers share how they implement culturally responsive instruction in their science classrooms.
13 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Science Remembering Challenger, 35 Years After Space Shuttle Tragedy
The launch had a lasting impact on a generation of teachers and children who watched.
3 min read
In this Sept. 13, 1985 file photo, Christa McAuliffe tries out the commander's seat on the flight deck of a shuttle simulator at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.
In this Sept. 13, 1985 file photo, Christa McAuliffe tries out the commander's seat on the flight deck of a shuttle simulator at the Johnson Space Center in Houston.
AP
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Whitepaper
How to promote equity using analogous phenomena
Having real-world connections promotes equity and enhances sensemaking for all students.
Content provided by Carolina Biological
Science Opinion How to Make Science Class Relevant During the Pandemic
COVID-19 and climate change prove why science standards can't ignore real-world concerns, write Andrew Zucker and Pendred Noyce.
Andrew Zucker & Pendred Noyce
5 min read
07Zucker IMG
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty