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Science News in Brief

Text Hearings Fuel Evolution Debate

By The Associated Press — September 24, 2013 1 min read

Dozens of experts and activists lined up to testify before the state board of education last week as it mulled approval of new science textbooks for classrooms around Texas.

The packed public hearing allowed the board to hear from Texans on 15 high school biology textbooks that have been submitted for board approval.

Its members, however, won’t vote on the proposed books until their November meeting.

Under a law approved in 2011, school districts can now choose books, electronic readers, and other materials without board approval. Still, most districts have continued using books sanctioned by the board.

The process already has sparked an outcry from some conservatives who would like to see evolution and climate change deemphasized in science lessons.

But experts say doing so would let ideology trump academic standards.

A version of this article appeared in the September 25, 2013 edition of Education Week as Text Hearings Fuel Evolution Debate

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