Science News in Brief

Texas Likely to Keep Lessons Challenging Evolution

By The Associated Press — February 14, 2017 1 min read

The Texas board of education has moved closer to tweaking—but still preserving—high school science curriculum requirements that teachers and academics say cast doubt on the theory of evolution.

After debating the issue this month, the Republican-controlled board dropped language that asked biology students to consider “all sides” of scientific theory. Experts critical of that wording said it allowed religious belief to trump science.

But the board inserted similar requirements on scrutinizing scientific conclusions. It kept lessons on the origin of life and gaps in the fossil record. Critics say the standards still challenge evolution. The board votes again in April.

A version of this article appeared in the February 15, 2017 edition of Education Week as Texas Likely to Keep Lessons Challenging Evolution

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