Teaching Profession

Teachers’ Union Spending

March 04, 2008 3 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Most of the nation’s largest unions must submit forms to the U.S. Department of Labor each year detailing how they spend their money. The National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers fall under that directive. From the hundreds of pages in the teachers’ unions’ most recent filings, Education Week selected highlights. Although the Labor Department requires unions to use uniform categories, the NEA and the AFT do not necessarily categorize expenditures the same way.

NEA AFT
Membership: 3.2 million teachers, paraprofessionals and schoolrelated personnel, and higher education faculty Membership: 1.4 million teachers, paraprofessionals and school-related personnel, higher education faculty, nurses and other health-care professionals, local, state, and federal employees, and retired members
State affiliates: 50
Local affiliates: More than 14,000
Headquarters staff: About 555
Period covered: 9/1/2006 - 8/31/2007
State affiliates: 43
Local affiliates: About 3,000
Headquarters staff: 305
Period covered: 7/1/2006 - 6/30/2007
Organization Spendings

TOP SALARIES
  • Larry Wicks, Executive director, Education Minnesota, state NEA affiliate (until late 2007) ** $331,472
  • John Wilson, NEA executive director
    $284,008
  • Reg Weaver, President
    $271,473
  • Dennis Van Roekel, Vice president
    $252,648
  • John Stocks, Deputy executive director
    $242,216
  • Edward J. McElroy, President $289,884
  • Nathaniel LaCour, Treasurer $232,942
  • Antonia Cortese, Executive vice president
    $230,534
  • Ronald Krouse, Chief of staff
    $199,825
  • Philip Kugler, Organizing director
    $199,825
  • Number of salaries over $140,000:
    95
    Number of NEA-paid officers/employees:
    750
    % of employees receiving over $140,000:
    12%
    Number of salaries over $140,000:
    17
    Number of NEA-paid officers/employees:
    346
    % of employees receiving over $140,000:
    4.9%
    TOP CONTRIBUTIONS TO EXTERNAL ORGANIZATIONS
  • Economic Policy Institute
    $150,000
  • Communities United to Strengthen America
    $150,000
  • People for the American Way
    $125,000
  • Working America
    $100,000
  • National Staff Development Council
    $70,500
  • Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute
    $57,500
  • Economic Policy Institute
    $450,000
  • National Public Pension Coalition
    $135,000
  • National Labor College
    $125,000
  • American Rights at Work
    $100,000
  • William J. Clinton Foundation
    $60,000
  • NAACP
    $53,557
  • TOP WORKPLACE-REPRESENTATION AND RECRUITING EXPENSES
  • Member litigation costs:
    $21.12 million
  • Member and staff education, including more than $1.2 million for NEA Today magazine and some $4 million for training related to contract negotiations and recruitment:
    $5.34 million
  • Membership promotional materials:
    $2.56 million
  • Discretionary assistance for core organizing projects:
    $4.87 million
  • Occupational liability insurance for affiliates’ members, directors, and officers:
    $2.17 million
  • Legal fees incurred by New York State United Teachers while defending members:
    $2.11 million
  • POLITICAL-ACTIVITIES EXPENDITURES
  • Taking on state ballot measures in Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Illinois, Ohio, Oregon, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Utah: ***
    $11,606,812
  • MSHC Partners, Washington (Contractual services: direct mail for member communication):
    $654,657
  • U.S. Postmaster (Political training for members and staff):
    $640,729
  • Bynum Thompson Ryer, Washington (Contractual services: direct mail for member communication):
    $633,005
  • Mack/Crounse Group, Alexandria, Va. (Contractual services: direct mail for member communication):
    $513,232
  • Terris, Barnes & Walters, San Francisco (Contractual services: political campaigns):
    $504,230
  • Political Action Committee, COPE (Committee on Political Education) fund:
    $4 million
  • Solidarity Fund (to fight ballot initiatives and referendum deemed to undermine workers’ rights, and to help state affiliates support candidates for state-level office):
    $2.3 million
  • State affiliate political-organizing assistance:
    $472,000
  • Member education program costs:
    $377,000
  • SOURCE: National Education Association
    Notes:
    * The NEA includes in this category grants to affiliates for various initiatives.
    ** Includes severance pay.
    *** Combined expenditures.
    SOURCE: American Federation of Teachers
    Related Tags:

    Analysis and compilation by Research Librarian Rachael Holovach, Assistant Editor Bess Keller, and Staff Writer Vaishali Honawar. Designed by Vanessa Solis.

    To examine the full LM-2s, as they are known, go to the Labor Department’s Web site at: http://erds.dol-esa.gov/query/getOrgQry.do
    A version of this article appeared in the March 05, 2008 edition of Education Week as Teachers’ Union Spending

    Events

    This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
    Sponsor
    Mathematics Webinar
    Addressing Unfinished Learning in Math: Providing Tutoring at Scale
    Most states as well as the federal government have landed on tutoring as a key strategy to address unfinished learning from the pandemic. Take math, for example. Studies have found that students lost more ground
    Content provided by Yup Math Tutoring
    Classroom Technology Webinar Building Better Blended Learning in K-12 Schools
    The pandemic and the increasing use of technology in K-12 education it prompted has added renewed energy to the blended learning movement as most students are now learning in school buildings (and will likely continue

    EdWeek Top School Jobs

    Teacher Jobs
    Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
    View Jobs
    Principal Jobs
    Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
    View Jobs
    Administrator Jobs
    Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
    View Jobs
    Support Staff Jobs
    Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
    View Jobs

    Read Next

    Teaching Profession What New Teachers Need
    Ideas from the real world on making teachers' first years less overwhelming and more fulfilling.
    5 min read
    Illustration of a classroom diorama sitting on a student desk.
    Illustration by Laura Baker/Education Week (Images: iStock/Getty)
    Teaching Profession Opinion This Year Almost Drove Me Out of Teaching. The Right Leader Made Me Stay
    After seven years teaching and one class away from becoming an education specialist, I have seen the highs and lows of education leadership.
    Samantha Richardson
    4 min read
    Illustration of woman sitting on a mountain top looking into the distant landscape.
    iStock/Getty
    Teaching Profession Maryland Teacher Wins $1 Million Global Prize
    Keishia Thorpe received the prize for her work teaching immigrant and refugee students and helping them attend college.
    2 min read
    This photo provided by the Varkey Foundation shows Keishia Thorpe. The Maryland high school English teacher, who has worked to open up college education for her students, has won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize. The Varkey Foundation announced Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2021, that Thorpe, who teaches at International High School at Langley Park in Prince George’s County in Maryland, was selected from more than 8,000 nominations and applications from 121 countries around the world.
    Keishia Thorpe, who has worked to open up college education for her students, has won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize.
    Varkey Foundation via AP
    Teaching Profession Opinion Teachers Need Therapy. Their Schools Should Pay for It
    You can’t have student mental well-being without investing in the adults around them, argues clinical psychologist Megan McCormick.
    Megan McCormick
    5 min read
    Illustration of nurturing.
    Laura Baker/Education Week and Ponomariova_Maria/iStock/Getty, DigitalVision Vectors