Science Report Roundup

Stem Instruction

October 11, 2012 1 min read

A collection of state-by-state reports on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics learning finds that in nearly every state, elementary students are getting less instructional time for science than they did in the mid-1990s, and that many students lack access to rigorous stem courses.

The statistics show, for example, that in grades 1-4 in California, the average number of hours a week spent learning science dropped from three in 1994 to 1.8 in 2008; in Maine, that figure went from 2.9 to 2.2 over the same period.

The reports were released this month by Change the Equation, a Washington-based coalition of corporate chief executives that promotes STEM education. The state reports also include scores from national assessments, the share of college graduates who earn STEM degrees, and how much advanced stem coursework the state’s science teachers took in college.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the September 19, 2012 edition of Education Week as STEM INSTRUCTION

Events

Jobs The EdWeek Top School Jobs Virtual Career Fair
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Engaging Young Students to Accelerate Math Learning
Join learning scientists and inspiring district leaders, for a timely panel discussion addressing a school district’s approach to doubling and tripling Math gains during Covid. What started as a goal to address learning gaps in
Content provided by Age of Learning & Digital Promise, Harlingen CISD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How to Power Your Curriculum With Digital Books
Register for this can’t miss session looking at best practices for utilizing digital books to support their curriculum.
Content provided by OverDrive

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Science The Latest Science Scores Are Out. The News Isn't Good for Schools
At a time when the pandemic highlights the importance of science, student scores in that subject are either flat or declining on NAEP.
6 min read
Palmyra Middle School English teacher Bethany Cover, far right, leads 7th and 8th graders on a walk to conduct a bird census as part of a science camp this week on the Appalachian trail near Palmyra, Pa. Students write about their scientific observations for the project, which integrates science lessons across the curriculum.
Palmyra Middle School English teacher Bethany Cover, far right, leads 7th and 8th graders on a walk to conduct a bird census as part of a science camp this week on the Appalachian Trail near Palmyra, Pa. Teachers across the curriculum work on the camp, at a time experts say science instruction is getting squeezed by schools' math and reading focus.
Courtesy of Jeff Remington
Science Opinion Effective Science Learning Means Observing and Explaining. There's a Curriculum for That
Researchers say grappling with problems beats out traditional approaches.
William R. Penuel
5 min read
A group of student scientists monitor a volcanic eruption
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and iStock/Getty Images Plus
Science Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About STEM Best Practices?
Quiz Yourself: How well do you know STEM best practices?
Science Science Teaching and Learning Found to Fall Off in Pandemic
The pandemic could have been a shining moment for STEM learning. Instead, new studies find, students and teachers struggled.
5 min read
Ahasbai Guerrero studies shadows in Gennifer Caven's 3rd grade classroom at El Verano Elementary School in Sonoma, Calif. San Francisco's Exploratorium developed an inquiry-based curriculum that blends English and science lessons.
Third grader Ahasbai Guerrero studies shadows as part of a pre-pandemic science program at El Verano Elementary School in Sonoma, Calif. New research suggests hands-on lessons like this have been difficult during the pandemic.
Ramin Rahimian for Education Week