College & Workforce Readiness

Some States Seek GED Alternative as Test Price Spikes

By The Associated Press — April 23, 2013 5 min read
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Several dozen states are looking for an alternative to the GED high-school-equivalency test because of concerns that a new version coming out next year is more costly and will no longer be offered in a pencil-and-paper format.

The responsibility for issuing high-school-equivalency certificates or diplomas rests with states, and they’ve relied on the General Education Development exam since soon after the test was created to help returning World War II veterans.

But now 40 states and the District of Columbia are participating in a working group that’s considering what’s available besides the GED, and two test-makers are hawking new exams.

“It’s a complete paradigm shift because the GED has been the monopoly. It’s been the only thing in town for high-school-equivalency testing. It’s kind of like Kleenex at this point,” said Amy Riker, the director of high-school-equivalency testing for the Educational Testing Service, which developed one of the alternative tests.

Rule Changes Sought

Last month, New York state, Montana, and New Hampshire announced they were switching to a new high-school-equivalency exam, and California officials began looking into amending regulations to drop the requirement that the state use only the GED test. Missouri has requested bids from test-makers and plans to make a decision this month. Several others states, including Indiana, Iowa, Maine, and Massachusetts, are looking into alternative exams, and New Jersey and Tennessee are exploring offering more than one test.

“The national situation is definitely fluid,” said Tom Robbins, Missouri’s director of adult education and high school equivalency, noting that other states plan to use the GED for now and bid later.

The pushback comes as the GED Testing Service prepares to introduce a new version of the exam in January. In the first revamp since for-profit Pearson VUE Testing acquired a joint-ownership interest in the nonprofit Washington-based GED Testing Service, the cost of the test is doubling to $120. That’s led to a case of sticker shock for test-takers, nonprofits, and states. Some states subsidize some or all of the expense of the exam, while others add an administrative fee. The new GED test will cost $140 to take in Missouri if the state sticks with it.

Kirk Proctor, of the Missouri Career Center, said the organization is looking for a way to cover the increased test cost for students participating in a GED-preparation and job-training program he oversees. He said his students can’t come up with $140, noting they need help paying for the current, cheaper test.

“A lot of them are just barely making it,” he said. “Transportation is a challenge. Eating is a challenge. For them, coming up with $140 for an assessment, it’s basically telling them, ‘Forget about ever getting this part of your life complete.’ ”

One program participant, Nicole Williams, a 21-year-old Kansas City mother of three, said she was hopeful she’d pass the GED test soon so she could avoid the electronic version. With it, she said, “you’ve got to learn how to type, use the computer, plus your GED. That’s three things instead of just trying to focus all on your GED test.”

Developers say the new version is needed because nearly all states are adopting tougher math and reading standards to ensure students are prepared for college and careers. Because the new version is so different, a million or so adults who have passed some but not all of the five parts of the current GED test must complete the missing sections by Dec. 31 or their scores will expire.

“The GED was in dangerous position of no longer being a reflection of what high schools were graduating,” said Randy Trask, the president and CEO of the GED Testing Service, which previously was solely operated by the nonprofit American Council on Education.

Online Format Benefits

He said the computerized version, which students are passing at higher rates than the paper version in pilot sites, will be cheaper to administer because states will no longer have to pick up the tab for tasks like grading the exam. For test-takers who fail a section, the computerized version provides details about what skills they need to work on before retaking the exam.

“I personally went into it a little bit naively,” said Mr. Trask of the new version. “I don’t know why I expected a marching band, but I did because I’m convinced that what we are doing is the right thing for the adults in this country.”

Competitors have responded with a paper version and a cheaper base price, although the GED Testing Service said its price includes services the other two test-makers do not. The alternative exams’ makers also said they would work with states to find ways to combine scores from the GED with their new exams so students who have passed some sections of the current GED won’t be forced to start from scratch. The GED Testing Service said that would undermine the validity of a state’s equivalency credential or diploma.

Mr. Trask also said he feared the competing exams would be confusing for colleges and employers. But states considering switching say they will put more emphasis on the equivalency credential or diploma they issue rather than the test taken to earn it.

Art Ellison, who leads the bureau of adult education in New Hampshire, called the sudden choice in the exams “the new reality of adult education.” His state and Montana are switching to HISET, a $50 test that the Educational Testing Service is offering.

Both states said cost influenced their decision. Montana Superintendent Denise Juneau said in a news release that residents “looking to improve their economic situation by obtaining a high-school-equivalency diploma should not have to overcome a significant financial barrier in order to achieve that goal.”

Skills Gap

Mr. Ellison also noted that a paper option was important because many students in adult education classes lack the skills needed to take a computer-based test, and that it would take time to beef up the courses to add that training.

Meanwhile, New York chose California-based CTB/McGraw-Hill’s new Test Assessing Secondary Completion. Developers said it will range in price from $50 to $60.

Chancellor Merryl Tisch of the state board of regents said in a news release that without the change, New York would have had to pay the GED test-maker twice as much or limit the number of test-takers because state law bars residents from being charged to take the equivalency exam.

“We can’t let price deny anyone the opportunity for success,” she said.

A version of this article appeared in the April 24, 2013 edition of Education Week as Some States Seek GED Alternative as Test Price Spikes

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