Special Education Report Roundup

Response to Intervention for ELLs

By Mary Ann Zehr — September 29, 2009 1 min read
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Response to Intervention, an instructional approach used with struggling students, is being seen as a more effective way than traditional approaches for determining if an English-language learner needs interventions that go beyond helping him or her to overcome language barriers, according to a research brief published by the Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English-Language Learners.

The brief notes that some school districts prohibit referral for special education services or assessment until English-learners have been in school for some period of time. The brief explains how RTI can be used to support ELLs before educators determine that those children might have a disability.

“The first step in following the RTI model is ensuring that general education instruction reflects best practice and meets the students’ academic and linguistic needs,” the authors of the brief write.

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A version of this article appeared in the September 30, 2009 edition of Education Week as Response to Intervention for ELLs

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