Curriculum

Reading Program Added to Ky. Budget

By David J. Hoff — April 26, 2005 1 min read

The following offers highlights of the recent legislative sessions. Precollegiate enrollment figures are based on fall 2004 data reported by state officials for public elementary and secondary schools. The figures for precollegiate education spending do not include federal flow-through funds, unless noted.

Kentucky

Gov. Ernie Fletcher’s successful effort this year to persuade the legislature to overhaul Kentucky’s tax system will pay dividends for schools next year.

The tax changes yielded an extra $130 million for the coming fiscal year, Mr. Fletcher said in an interview last week. “That gave us a bridge to start some initiatives in education,” the first-term Republican governor added.

Gov. Ernie Fletcher

Republican
Senate:
15 Democrats
22 Republicans
1 Independent

House:
57 Democrats
42 Republicans

Enrollment:
653,000

The two largest of those initiatives aim at improving elementary school achievement in reading and mathematics. With the goal of getting all pupils reading at grade level by the end of 3rd grade, the $11.1 million Read to Achieve program will provide diagnostic screening and interventions in every public elementary school. A $3.9 million program will provide similar services in math.

Lawmakers failed to agree to a statewide budget in last year’s session, but Gov. Fletcher used his executive authority to keep the state operating. In the budget passed last month for the 2005 and 2006 fiscal years, precollegiate spending will jump from $2.9 billion in fiscal 2004 to $3.4 billion in 2006—a 15 percent increase over the biennium. State per-pupil aid will increase from $3,191 to $3,445 over the same period—an 8 percent rise. Preschool spending will climb from $44.8 million to $51.6 million over the biennium, a 15 percent increase. The total operating budget for fiscal 2006 will be $8.2 billion.

In other action, legislators passed an anti-obesity bill that forbids the sale of high-fat snacks and sodas in school vending machines. The bill requires K-5 schools to give students opportunities for “moderate to vigorous physical activity” for up to 30 minutes a day.

School officials are awaiting regulations from the state board of education defining exactly what that exercise will be. That exercise could be as simple as a few minutes of calisthenics or a walk around school grounds.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Building Leadership Excellence Through Instructional Coaching
Join this webinar for a discussion on instructional coaching and ways you can link your implement or build on your program.
Content provided by Whetstone Education/SchoolMint
Teaching Webinar Tips for Better Hybrid Learning: Ask the Experts What Works
Register and ask your questions about hybrid learning to our expert panel.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
Family Engagement for Student Success With Dr. Karen Mapp
Register for this free webinar to learn how to empower and engage families for student success featuring Karen L. Mapp.
Content provided by Panorama Education & PowerMyLearning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

2021-2022 Teacher (Districtwide)
Dallas, TX, US
Dallas Independent School District
[2021-2022] Founding Middle School Academic Dean
New York, NY, US
DREAM Charter School
DevOps Engineer
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association
Senior Business Analyst - 12 Month Contract
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association

Read Next

Curriculum Leader To Learn From Taking an Unapologetic Approach to Curriculum Overhaul
An academic leader at a charter school has overhauled curriculum—and proved that instructional rigor and anti-racism can co-exist.
11 min read
Danielle Kelsick, Chief Academic Officer for the Environmental Charter Schools in Redondo Beach, Calif.
Danielle Kelsick, Chief Academic Officer for the Environmental Charter Schools in Redondo Beach, Calif.
Nick Agro for Education Week
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Whitepaper
Educator Survey Results: Meeting the Demands of Hybrid Learning with eBooks
With COVID-19 altering nearly all aspects of daily life, including the way students learn, this survey sought insight from those on the f...
Content provided by OverDrive
Curriculum Opinion Ian Rowe Discusses 1776 Unites and His Efforts to Promote a Vision of a Unified America
Ian Rowe, co-founder of 1776 Unites, discusses the initiative and its efforts to promote pathways to opportunity for Americans of all races.
7 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Curriculum From ‘Stunning’ to ‘Surprising’: How News of the Capitol Attack Was Repackaged for Schools
Experts criticized ed-tech company Newsela for sugarcoating the violent insurrection when it adapted an Associated Press story for schools.
6 min read
A man dressed as George Washington and holding a Trump flag kneels and prays near the Washington Monument on Jan. 6.
A man dressed as George Washington and holding a Trump flag kneels and prays near the Washington Monument on Jan. 6.
Carolyn Kaster/AP