Opinion
Teaching Opinion

RTI for the Gifted?

April 09, 2010 1 min read

In a recent entry on her blog on Teacher, gifted education specialist Tamara Fisher argued that conventional RTI models are predisposed to leave out advanced students. Just as there are intervention tiers designed for struggling students, she wrote, there should be inverse, accelerated-learning tiers for the gifted. She offered the following illustration of what a more inclusive RTI model might look like.

RTI for the Gifted

Read the complete post on Fisher’s blog, Unwrapping the Gifted.

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A version of this article appeared in the April 12, 2010 edition of Teacher PD Sourcebook

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