Curriculum Report Roundup

More College Graduates Going Directly Into Teaching

By Debra Viadero — August 11, 2005 1 min read
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The percentage of students who immediately begin jobs in teaching after graduating from a four-year college is growing, a federal study suggests.

“Elementary/Secondary School Teaching Among Recent College Graduates: 1994 and 2001" is posted by the National Center for Education Statistics.

According to the report, 12 percent of a nationally representative sample of students who received bachelor’s degrees in 2001 taught school within a year of graduation—up from 10 percent of 1993 graduates. The study by the National Center for Education Statistics, an arm of the U.S. Department of Education, attributes much of that growth to an increase in the percentage of certified teachers who found jobs after graduation, which rose from 7 percent to 9 percent.

The federal statisticians also found that the newly minted teachers they surveyed from the college class of 2001 had lower scores on entrance exams but higher cumulative GPAs than peers who chose different professions.

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