English-Language Learners Report Roundup

English-Language Learners

By Lesli A. Maxwell — March 06, 2012 1 min read

A new report offers some guidance for classroom teachers working with English-language learners in seven states in the central part of the United States, where the number of students learning English is climbing steadily.

The report, released last week by the Institute for Education Sciences, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Education, focuses on Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

It spells out what K-8 general education teachers are expected to know and be able to do to teach ELLs and notes where some states’ teaching standards fall short in addressing topics that research has shown to be key to improving achievement for English-learners.

The guide was put together for the institute by the Regional Educational Laboratory Central in Englewood, Colo.

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A version of this article appeared in the March 08, 2012 edition of Education Week as English-Language Learners

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