Teaching Profession News in Brief

Boston Teachers, City Reach Labor Deal

By The Associated Press — September 18, 2012 1 min read
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The Boston Teachers Union and the city have reached a tentative contract agreement after more than two years of negotiations. The union president said the deal was reached Sept. 12 after an 11-hour negotiating session.

Earlier negotiations had stalled over a new teacher-evaluation system. Under the new system, the city will rely more heavily on student achievement in evaluations.

Union President Richard Stutman said the district agreed to lower class size in underperforming grades and to hire more nurses, social workers, and assistants under some circumstances.

The city’s approximately 125 schools also will have greater flexibility to hire teachers transferring from another school. The city has about 5,000 teachers.

A version of this article appeared in the September 19, 2012 edition of Education Week as Boston Teachers, City Reach Labor Deal

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