Curriculum News in Brief

Arts Program Targeting Failing Schools Expands

By Jessica Brown — June 08, 2015 1 min read
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A program that uses arts education to help turn around failing schools is expanding for the second time.

The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities announced last week that its Turnaround Arts initiative has added five districts: Bridgeport, Conn.; Broward County, Fla.; Hawaii’s statewide system; New York City; and the District of Columbia. All the districts also have local partners.

The initiative now reaches more than 22,000 students in 49 schools across 14 states and the District of Columbia. It targets “turnaround schools"—those selected by the U.S. Department of Education for extra resources from federal agencies and private foundations because they are in the bottom 5 percent of their states’ schools in student achievement.

A version of this article appeared in the June 10, 2015 edition of Education Week as Arts Program Targeting Failing Schools Expands

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