Education Funding Video

The 2018 Election Is All About Education - Part 2: School Funding

October 23, 2018 3:52

While the economy has roared back to life in recent years, public schools in large swaths of the country are still starved for money. State sales-tax revenue has flattened as more people shop online and, while unemployment is at historic lows, earnings have not rebounded to pre-Recession levels. How—or whether—to pour more money into public school coffers has emerged as one of the most divisive issues for states in this year’s midterm elections. Many conservative candidates have accused school districts of wasting tax dollars while more liberal candidates have proposed raising taxes in order to shore up school funding. In part two of Education Week’s series on the midterm elections of 2018, Daarel Burnette and Kavitha Cardoza take a look at how school funding has played into the campaigns. (October 23, 2018)

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