Student Well-Being

Study Finds Special Educators Have Less Access to Mentors

By Sarah D. Sparks — January 11, 2011 3 min read

While teacher mentoring has become nearly ubiquitous as an education reform, new research suggests state and district mentoring policies may leave gaps in support for special education teachers.

Mentoring, in which a new or struggling teacher is matched with an expert instructor for support and training, has won broad support. Nearly all states have a teacher mentoring program—most as part of induction for new teachers—but some, such as Alabama and Virginia, for any teacher not meeting state teaching standards.

Yet a study published in the current issue of the Education Policy Analysis Archives found that even within a state that requires mentoring for all new teachers, only 64.4 percent of special education teachers reported access to a mentor, compared with 85.6 percent of general education teachers studied. The quality and length of the mentoring relationships that were available differed from district to district for both general and special education teachers, and did not always meet state requirements, according to study author Leah Wasburn-Moses, an assistant professor of educational psychology at Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio.

That’s of concern, experts say, because states have included mentoring as a centerpiece of many school improvement initiatives, in spite of still-limited evidence of when and how mentoring improves student achievement.

“We have to go beyond ‘mentoring can be good’ to look at these special populations, like special education, to find out what really works to improve student achievement,” Ms. Wasburn-Moses said. “This is a [teaching] population that really, really needs mentoring because of the complexity of the positions and the differences within and between schools and the high attrition due to stress.”

Gaps Nationwide?

Most states require preservice student teaching for special educators, said George A. Giuliani, the executive director of the Washington-based National Association of Special Education Teachers, but he agreed that those teachers often have less access to mentors once they actually begin to teach.

Ms. Wasburn-Moses’ study examined implementation in urban districts in a single, unnamed Midwestern state. But Shirley A. Dawson, a special education instructor with the University of Utah’s college of education, said special education teachers may face similar gaps in access to mentors nationwide. In a 2010 study of state mentoring policies, Ms. Dawson found that while 48 states have mentoring laws, regulations or programs, policies tend to be vague on how special educators are included. Fourteen states require districts to match teachers to mentors in the same grade or subject, but only Kentucky specifically requires special educators to receive a mentor who also teaches special education.

Mr. Giuliani and Ms. Wasburn-Moses agreed that finding a mentor with suitable expertise can be especially hard for special education teachers because of the wide range of pedagogical skills their job requires.

“The field is so varied that some special [education] teachers do things that are very similar to what general [education] teachers do, while some teachers are working with very, very specialized populations, and they do completely different things,” said Ms. Wasburn-Moses. Mentors can help both types of teachers, Mr. Giuliani said, if they focus on teaching them to differentiate instruction and use a universal design for learning. Universal design involves teaching and classroom space that allow a variety of students, including those with disabilities or English-language learners, to learn.

“In terms of mentoring,” he said, “it’s not just knowing how to teach the content, but knowing what’s out there in terms of assistive technology and knowing what’s available to teachers.”

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A version of this article appeared in the January 12, 2011 edition of Education Week as Study Finds Special Educators Have Less Access to Mentors

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