School & District Management

Spellings Sets New Structure for Ed. Dept.

By Christina A. Samuels — March 05, 2005 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The U.S. Department of Education announced a restructuring plan on March 4 that will move several offices under one of two umbrellas, as well as create a new office that will handle communications and a new office dealing with policy development.

The office of the deputy secretary of education will now focus on K-12 policy, which includes implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and President Bush’s High School Initiative. The deputy secretary will supervise the offices of elementary and secondary education, innovation and improvement, English-language acquisition, special education and rehabilitative services, and safe and drug-free schools, along with other precollegiate initiatives.

Higher and adult education policy will be the focus of the undersecretary of education, who will oversee the offices of postsecondary education and vocational and adult education, as well as student financial aid and other college-level initiatives.

The two new offices will be headed by assistant secretaries, who are subject to confirmation by the Senate and will report directly to Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. The new office of planning, evaluation, and policy development will supervise the budget service, the strategic-accountability service, and the policy and program-studies service. It will coordinate the work of the educational technology office.

The new office of communications and outreach will oversee public affairs and intergovernmental and interagency affairs.

David Dunn, Ms. Spellings’ chief of staff, said in a telephone press conference that the secretary, who took office with the start of President Bush’s second term, has been reviewing functions at the department for several weeks.

“We are really going to try to align the organizational structure with the key, critical missions of the U.S. Department of Education,” Mr. Dunn said.

The heads of the new offices will play much-needed roles in the department, he said.

“As new policies are developed, all of the various program offices impacted or with a stake in these policies are going to have a seat at the table from the beginning,” through the office of planning, evaluation, and policy development, he said.

In addition, the communications office will end the “decentralized and fragmented” communications process that Secretary Spellings believes is in place now, Mr. Dunn said.

The changes are expected to take place over the next several weeks. The current undersecretary of education, Edward R. “Ted” McPherson, will shift to a senior adviser position to oversee the restructuring.

Mr. McPherson’s replacement, as well as the deputy secretary—who will succeed Eugene W. Hickok—and the two new assistant secretaries, have yet to be nominated

Related Tags:

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Transform Teaching and Learning with AI
Increase productivity and support innovative teaching with AI in the classroom.
Content provided by Promethean
Curriculum Webinar Computer Science Education Movement Gathers Momentum. How Should Schools React?
Discover how schools can expand opportunities for students to study computer science education.
School & District Management Webinar Fostering Student Well-Being with Programs That Work
Protecting student well-being has never been more important. Join this webinar to learn how to ensure your programs yield the best outcomes.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management What People Don't Get About Being a Principal: Reflections From 3 Leaders
As school leaders mark National Principals Month, three principals discuss why they do what they do.
10 min read
Principals who are part of the online group known as Moms As Principals met face-to-face for the first time last month during a national conference in Philadelaphia.
Principals who are part of the online group known as Moms As Principals met face-to-face for the first time during a national conference in Philadelphia.
Denisa R. Superville/Education Week
School & District Management Spotlight Spotlight on K-12 Decision-Making
This Spotlight will help you learn how teachers can help drive systemic change, evaluate school progress on driving equity, and more.
School & District Management Will Schools Reopen Quickly After Hurricane Ian Passes? It Depends
Even before district leaders started shelter operations, they were getting asked when kids could return.
Jeffrey S. Solochek, Tampa Bay Times
3 min read
Beulah Stand, a sixth grade math teacher at John Hopkins, carries her pillow and a suitcase into the Pinellas County special needs shelter at John Hopkins Middle School, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022 in St. Petersburg, Fla., as Florida's west coast prepares for Hurricane Ian. Stand will be staying at the center to work during the storm. The evacuation center, which is only for people with special needs, has a capacity of over 700 people.
Beulah Stand, a 6th grade math teacher at John Hopkins, carries her pillow and a suitcase into the Pinellas County special needs shelter at John Hopkins Middle School in St. Petersburg, Fla., as Florida's west coast prepares for Hurricane Ian. Stand will be staying at the center to work during the storm. The evacuation center, which is only for people with special needs, has a capacity of over 700 people.
Dirk Shadd/Tampa Bay Times via AP
School & District Management How District Leaders Can Make Sure Teachers Don't Miss the Loan-Forgiveness Deadline
Many teachers and other public employees may not know they qualify for a student loan-forgiveness waiver that has an Oct. 31 deadline.
4 min read
Young adult woman cutting the ball and chain labeled "Debt" which is attached as the tassel hanging from a graduate's mortarboard
iStock/Getty Images Plus