Professional Development Report Roundup

Research Report: Professional Development

By Samantha Stainburn — May 20, 2014 1 min read
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A new report looks at how expanded school schedules can be used to boost teacher effectiveness by allowing more time for educators to plan with colleagues, analyze student data, and develop new skills.

The report from the National Center on Time & Learning, a research and advocacy group in Boston, uses examples from 17 high-achieving schools that serve high-poverty students and are open, on average, 300 hours more per year than the national norm of 1,170 hours.

The study found that, while the typical teacher spends 80 percent of his or her time on instruction and just 20 percent on other activities, teachers in those schools spend about 60 percent of their time on instruction and 40 percent on such activities as collaboration, peer coaching, and acquisition of new content knowledge.

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A version of this article appeared in the May 21, 2014 edition of Education Week as Professional Development

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