School & District Management

Pa. Board Divided Over Naming School for Rustin

By Catherine Gewertz — December 11, 2002 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

So proudly did West Chester, Pa., claim the civil rights luminary Bayard Rustin as its most famous native son that the school board decided to name its new high school after him.

But that was before they found out that the late Mr. Rustin was gay, had belonged to a Communist group, and had refused to serve in World War II.

Now, the board is rethinking its decision, sparking a debate that is drawing national—and unwelcome—publicity.

“It’s embarrassing that this is even happening,” said Stephen Sander, a retired teacher in the Philadelphia suburb who supports naming the school after Mr. Rustin. “It makes us look like 1950 all over again. [Mr. Rustin] is only controversial to bigots. To everyone else, he’s an American hero.”

The board was expected to decide the issue by the end of January.

Born in 1912, Mr. Rustin attended West Chester schools. A Quaker, his pacifist beliefs led him to refuse to register for World War II or to perform alternative service, a move that put him behind bars for 28 months. He went on to work extensively in the civil rights movement, perhaps most notably as the chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, during which the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. made his “I Have a Dream” speech. Mr. Rustin died in 1987.

June L. Cardosi, a board member for the 12,000-student West Chester district, noted that the city already has a park named after Mr. Rustin. She and others oppose naming the high school after him mostly because of his anti- war efforts. That work, combined with his homosexuality and his four-year membership in the Young Communist League, makes him an inappropriate role model for teenagers, she said.

“We acknowledge that he made valuable inroads in the civil rights area, but we are more concerned with his personal characteristics,” Ms. Cardosi said.

Officials of civil rights and gay-support groups lamented the dispute.

‘In the Best Tradition’

“What kind of message does this send to young people: that such an important figure in the civil-rights movement is not worthy of our respect because he’s a gay man?” said Eliza Byard, the deputy executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network, a national group based in New York City.

Hugh B. Price, the president of the National Urban League, also based in New York, said that Mr. Rustin and others who experienced oppression in America had looked to Communism for the freedom that eluded them at home. And Mr. Rustin’s anti-war activities represented not an act of disloyalty, Mr. Price said, but a commitment to nonviolence.

“What he stood for—tolerance, civil rights, justice, and political activism—is in the best tradition of America,” Mr. Price said. “His hometown should not only name a school after him, but they probably ought to have a [high school social studies] course built around his life.”

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the December 11, 2002 edition of Education Week as Pa. Board Divided Over Naming School for Rustin

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
Innovative Funding Models: A Deep Dive into Public-Private Partnerships
Discover how innovative funding models drive educational projects forward. Join us for insights into effective PPP implementation.
Content provided by Follett Learning
Budget & Finance Webinar Staffing Schools After ESSER: What School and District Leaders Need to Know
Join our newsroom for insights on investing in critical student support positions as pandemic funds expire.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
How can districts build sustainable tutoring models before the money runs out?
District leaders, low on funds, must decide: broad support for all or deep interventions for few? Let's discuss maximizing tutoring resources.
Content provided by Varsity Tutors for Schools

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management Quiz What Do You Know About the Most Influential People in School Districts? Take Our Quiz
Answer 7 questions about the superintendent profession.
1 min read
Image of icons for gender, pay, demographics.
Canva
School & District Management Opinion I Invited My Students to Be the Principal for a Day. Here’s What I Learned
When I felt myself slipping into a springtime slump, this simple activity reminded me of my “why” as an educator.
S. Kambar Khoshaba
4 min read
052024 OPINION Khoshaba PRINCIPAL end the year with positivity
E+/Getty + Vanessa Solis/Education Week via Canva
School & District Management The Complicated Fight Over Four-Day School Weeks
Missouri lawmakers want to encourage large districts to maintain five-day weeks—even as four-day weeks grow more popular.
7 min read
Calendar 4 day week
iStock/Getty
School & District Management From Our Research Center Principal Salaries: The Gap Between Expectation and Reality
Exclusive survey data indicate a gap between the expectations and the realities of principal pay.
4 min read
A Black woman is standing on a ladder and looking into the distance with binoculars, in the background is an ascending arrow.
iStock/Getty