Recruitment & Retention

New Orleans Soliciting Businesses For Bonuses

By David J. Hoff — May 01, 2002 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The school district in New Orleans is offering bonuses to newly certified teachers—and looking for help to pay for the incentive.

The Orleans Parish district has more than 700 uncertified teachers among its faculty of 5,700, and is asking businesses in the city and the surrounding area to donate money toward the signing bonuses it plans to give to new certified teachers starting in the fall, said Al Davis, its the chief executive officer.

He said the 73,000-student district would match the donations with its own money. “If 100 businesses send from $500 to $2,500, I would be elated with that,” Mr. Davis said.

New Orleans’ Recruit A Certified Teacher program— or REACTis one of many novel approaches that urban districts are using to hire or train qualified teachers to address shortages. (“Urban Districts Employing More Aggressive Hiring Tactics,” Oct. 3, 2001.)

In addition to REACT, the district is offering evening courses at its offices that teachers need to earn certification in their fields. But the district has decided that it needs to do more, Mr. Davis said.

A New Twist

To lure certified teachers— either new to or already in the profession—New Orleans will pay bonuses of $1,000 to $5,000. Mr. Davis said he expects to hire enough new certified teachers over several years to replace the uncertified ones now in the classroom. If the district pays an average $3,000 bonus to 700 new teachers, it will need to raise a total of $2.1 million in public and private funds, a figure that could be spread out over several years.

The money from businesses will offset some of the district’s costs. The New Orleans economy relies on tourism, casinos, and oil refineries.

As of late last week,the district had received one $2,500 check and promises that more checks are on the way, said Linetta McIver, a district spokeswoman.

In the past decade, many districts have worked with banks, real estate companies, and relocation services to help teachers cut their costs in settling into a new area, according to B.J. Bryant, the executive director of the American Association for Employment in Education, a Columbus, Ohio-based group representing school human-resources directors. This is the first time Ms. Bryant has heard of a district raising private money to pay for signing bonuses.

Paying such bonuses “is an idea that’s been around a long time,” she said, “but it’s become a lot more common now.”

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the May 01, 2002 edition of Education Week as New Orleans Soliciting Businesses For Bonuses

Events

Classroom Technology K-12 Essentials Forum Making Technology Work Better in Schools
Join experts for a look at the steps schools are taking (or should take) to improve the use of technology in schools.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
The ABCs of ESSER: How to Make the Most of Relief Funds Before They Expire
Join a diverse group of K-12 experts to learn how to leverage federal funds before they expire and improve student learning environments.
Content provided by Johnson Controls
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Modernizing Principal Support: The Road to More Connected and Effective Leaders
When principals are better equipped to lead, support, and maintain high levels of teaching and learning, outcomes for students are improved.
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Recruitment & Retention Opinion What a Birthday Card Says About How Your School Is Run
District and school culture doesn’t just happen. It starts with who and what a leader recognizes—or doesn’t.
Laurie J. Carr
3 min read
Conceptual illustration of a group of people bringing together geometric shapes
Alisa Zahoruiko/iStock/Getty
Recruitment & Retention 4 Steps to Building Your Own School Staffing Pipeline
Here's some creative ways to get around the staff shortage that's plagued many schools.
4 min read
Haines City Senior High School Principal Adam Lane plays guitar for teachers during a teacher-appreciation luncheon at the high school.
Haines City Senior High School Principal Adam Lane plays guitar for teachers during a teacher-appreciation luncheon at the high school in Polk County, Fla.
Zack Wittman for Education Week
Recruitment & Retention Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About Staffing Shortages?
Answer 7 questions to see what you know about staffing shortages.
Recruitment & Retention School Support Staffers Don't Make a Living Wage. Here's a Comparison by State
The average full-time paraprofessional or other support worker makes $32,837 a year, a National Education Association analysis finds.
2 min read
Food service assistant Brenda Bartee, rear, gives students breakfast, Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021, during the first day of school at Washington Elementary School in Riviera Beach, Fla.
Food service assistant Brenda Bartee, rear, gives students breakfast last August at Washington Elementary School in Riviera Beach, Fla.
Wilfredo Lee/AP