Equity & Diversity Report Roundup

Immigrant Students

By Corey Mitchell — October 31, 2017 1 min read

Children of immigrants are more likely to struggle in school and more likely to live in poverty than children of U.S. natives, a new Annie E. Casey Foundation report concludes.

Nationally, there are 18 million children who live with immigrant parents. The vast majority of those children, 88 percent, are U.S. citizens; at least 5 million of them have at least one parent who is undocumented.

The Casey Foundation report found that a smaller percentage of English-language learners from immigrant families score at or above proficient on state reading and math tests when compared with students from nonimmigrant families.

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A version of this article appeared in the November 01, 2017 edition of Education Week as Immigrant Students

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